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Free performance report on all Hornsby agents

There are 109 real estate agents servicing Hornsby and surrounds. In 2016 they sold 451 properties. We have analysed all these Hornsby agents and on request within 24 hours we will send you a free, up-to-date report on their performance, sales track record and what fees you should pay. View report contents

We are the only service in Australia that analyses all local agents and their performance, and provides this to you in a transparent and unbiased manner. View frequently asked questions

We pride ourselves on providing independent, insightful analysis on real estate agents. Read real client case studies to see how we continually exceed expectations. We never disclose your details to any agents unless you specifically instruct us to do so.

Real Estate Agents Hornsby – 2016/17 Performance

Hornsby Real Estate Agents sold 451 properties over the last 12 months (128 houses and 323 units). On average these 128 Hornsby houses took 55 days to sell and were sold at an average discount of -6% from their initial listing price. Hornsby units on average took 54 days to sell and were sold at an average discount of -3% from their initial listing price.

The best Hornsby Real Estate Agents sell properties considerably better than these average figures. We detail who these Hornsby agents are in our free report

Importantly it is the performance of the individual real estate agent rather than the agency used that matters. With over 109 agents operating in the Hornsby – South council area servicing the Hornsby market and 41 agencies, vendors should only use those Hornsby agents who routinely deliver superior results for their clients. This is crucial to maximise their chances of securing the best possible price for their Hornsby property.

With total house growth of 27% over the last five years Hornsby agents have had it reasonably easy selling into an appreciating market. Units have fared not as well growing at 26%. Growth in Hornsby houses over the last year has been below the five year annual growth rate, coming in at 3% for houses (5yr average 5%) and below for units 4% (5yr average 5%).

Request your free report for the individual performance details of real estate agents in Hornsby and the properties they have sold over the last couple of years.

With Hornsby houses only selling on average every 12 years and units every 8 years, securing the best Hornsby real estate agent to manage this infrequent transaction is crucial.

At the end of the day choosing the best Hornsby real estate agent to sell your property can make years of difference to your personal financial situation.

Suburb Overview

Hornsby is a suburb that lies between vaguely defined areas of the Upper North Shore, and Northern Suburbs of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia 25 kilometres north-west of the Sydney central business district. It is the administrative centre of the local government area of Hornsby Shire.

The name Hornsby is derived from Convict -turned- Constable Samuel Henry Horne, who took part in the apprehension of bushrangers Dalton and MacNamara on 22 June 1830. In return he was granted land which he named Hornsby Place.

The first European settler in the area was Thomas Higgins, who received a grant of land in Old Mans Valley. A railway station named "Hornsby Junction" opened on 17 September 1886 to the north of the town of Hornsby, which had developed on the site of Horne's grant. It formed the junction of the Northern Line and the North Shore Line which were yet to be completed at that time. Hornsby station was one stop further south on the Northern Line. Due to confusion by commuters alighting at the incorrect station expecting to transfer to a connecting train, the old Hornsby station was renamed Normanhurst on 17 November, 1898 after prominent local activist and engineer Norman Selfe, while the Hornsby Junction station assumed the current name of Hornsby.

The first Hornsby Post Office opened on 1 August 1864, and was renamed South Hornsby on 1 May 1900, the same day Hornsby Junction office near the railway station was renamed Hornsby. The latter office remains open;the South Hornsby office was renamed Normanhurst in 1905.

The Hornsby Shire Council was established in 1906. In 1961, The Westfield Group built a shopping mall at Hornsby, making it one of the first suburbs in Sydney with a modern-style shopping centre. A competing shopping centre, Northgate, opened in 1979 but was eventually bought by Westfield. In late 1999, the two sites were amalgamated when the original Westfield was demolished and Northgate was renovated to create the new Westfield Hornsby which opened in November 2001.

Hornsby is 26 km by train from the Sydney central business district and is approximately 24.5 km by road. Hornsby railway station is a junction of the Northern Line and the North Shore line of the City Rail network. There are frequent railway services to the central business district via Epping on the Northern Line or via Chatswood on the North Shore Line. Hornsby is also a transport junction of Northern Sydney with Intercity and Express trains stopping here on the way to the Central Coast, Newcastle and further north.

Bus services operate from Hornsby, most by TransdevTSL, to local areas such as Normanhurst.

The Pacific Highway, which passes through Hornsby, was formerly the main road link between Sydney and north-eastern Australia. The completion of the F3 Sydney-Newcastle Freeway, which has its southern end at the neighbouring suburb of Wahroonga, means that the heavy traffic now bypasses the already busy Hornsby town area.

Hornsby remains a busy commercial centre, just as it was a century ago. Over the years, the town centre has developed distinct characteristics on either side of the railway line.

The western side consists of a traditional high street shopping village along the Old Pacific Highway. A short section of the highway north of the shops still has several antique lamp posts preserved. On the eastern side of the highway from south to north are the police station, the court house and the historic Hornsby Shire Council chamber . On the western side is Hornsby Park with a closed swimming pool, Hornsby Aquatic Centre, and bushland beyond it and Hornsby TAFE. A large war memorial and the adjacent RSL Club is located at the southern end of the shops.

The eastern side is dominated by Westfield Hornsby, a shopping centre, which features two department stores , a cinema multiplex, a food court and several restaurants. The intersection of Florence Street and Hunter Street became a pedestrian mall in the early 1990s. At the centre of the pedestrian mall is a large water clock sculpture, designed by Victor Cusack. The public library is also located in this area.

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