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Free performance report on all Croydon agents

There are 77 real estate agents servicing Croydon and surrounds. In 2016 they sold 141 properties. We have analysed all these Croydon agents and on request within 24 hours we will send you a free, up-to-date report on their performance, sales track record and what fees you should pay. View report contents

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Real Estate Agents Croydon – 2016/17 Performance

Croydon Real Estate Agents sold 141 properties over the last 12 months (94 houses and 47 units). On average these 94 Croydon houses took 49 days to sell and were sold at an average discount of -8% from their initial listing price. Croydon units on average took 58 days to sell and were sold at an average discount of -4% from their initial listing price.

The best Croydon Real Estate Agents sell properties considerably better than these average figures. We detail who these Croydon agents are in our free report

Importantly it is the performance of the individual real estate agent rather than the agency used that matters. With over 77 agents operating in the Burwood council area servicing the Croydon market and 29 agencies, vendors should only use those Croydon agents who routinely deliver superior results for their clients. This is crucial to maximise their chances of securing the best possible price for their Croydon property.

With total house growth of 37% over the last five years Croydon agents have had it reasonably easy selling into an appreciating market. Units have fared not as well growing at 16%. Growth in Croydon houses over the last year has been below the five year annual growth rate, coming in at -4% for houses (5yr average 7%) and above for units 8% (5yr average 3%).

Request your free report for the individual performance details of real estate agents in Croydon and the properties they have sold over the last couple of years.

With Croydon houses only selling on average every 11 years and units every 8 years, securing the best Croydon real estate agent to manage this infrequent transaction is crucial.

At the end of the day choosing the best Croydon real estate agent to sell your property can make years of difference to your personal financial situation.

Suburb Overview

Croydon is an affluent suburb in the inner-west of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. Croydon is located 11 kilometres west of the Sydney central business district. Croydon is split between the two local government areas of Burwood Council and the Municipality of Ashfield.

The suburb is nestled between the commercial centres of Ashfield and Burwood. It is bounded by Parramatta Road to the north, Iron Cove Creek to the east, Arthur Street to the south and a number of different streets to the west. To the north are Kings and Canada Bays on the closest reach of the Parramatta River, to the northwest is Concord Hospital and the Olympic Games complex at Homebush Bay. To the south is Canterbury Racecourse.

Prior to the arrival of Europeans, the area now known as Croydon was home to the Wangal clan of the Dharug people. Their territory was believed to be centred on Concord and stretched east to the swampland of Long Cove Creek. The land was heavily wooded at the time with tall eucalypts, blackbutts and turpentines covering the higher ground and mangroves, swamp oaks and swamp mahoganies in the lower swampy ground of Iron Cove Creek. The diet of the Wangal was primarily fish so they spent most of their time living near the shores of the Parramatta River and fishing in canoes. The land away from the river shores provided fruits, berries and edible plants as well as possums and kangaroos, which were killed both for food and their skins.

The arrival of the First Fleet in 1788 had a devastating effect on the local people, mainly from the introduction of smallpox, to which the indigenous people had no resistance. The disease spread quickly so that many indigenous people died of this white man's disease without ever having seen a white man. The Wangal certainly got to see the white men. One of their leaders, Bennelong, even befriended the first governor of New South Wales, Arthur Phillip, and was taken by him to England.

After establishing the colony at Sydney Cove in early 1788, Phillip ordered that a second settlement be established at Rose Hill later that same year to increase the prospects of establishing successful farms. Within a year or so, a land route had been established between the two settlements, cutting through the territory of the Cadigal, Wangal and Burramattagal along the way. This rough track later became the main artery of the expanding Greater Sydney and, as the northern boundary of what is now Croydon, dictated early British settlement in the area.

Governor Phillip showed great reluctance to grant large amounts of land to his colonists, restricting land grants to the towns and people actively planning to farm the land. After his return to England in 1792, acting governor Major Francis Grose and his successor Captain William Paterson pursued the opposite policy granting large swathes of land to their friends prior to the arrival of the second official governor John Hunter in 1795.

The first land grant in the Croydon area was to Captain John Townson in April 1793 who received 100 acres on Parramatta Road stretching west from Iron Cove Creek and south to what is now Queen Street. Further grants were made in 1794 to: Private J Eades ;James Brackenrig ;Augustus Alt, the first surveyor -general of NSW, ;and Sarah Nelson . Alt was the first to take up residence on his land, naming it 'Hermitage Farm'. However, his house was burnt down by a group of indigenous people in 1797 and he didn't return to Croydon, establishing himself in neighbouring Ashfield, and selling his property to John Palmer.

By 1820 a large part of the area had been subsumed by Joseph Underwood's large 'Ashfield Park Estate'. This property remained largely intact for more than 40 years, until it was subdivided into large blocks after the death of Elizabeth Underwood in 1858. By this time its proximity to the railway made it a desirable area . One of these subdivisions was the 'Highbury Estate', on part of which Anthony Hordern, son of the founder of the great retail firm, Anthony Hordern & Sons, eventually built his house 'Shubra Hall', just beyond the west border of Ashfield. It later became part of the Presbyterian Ladies' College, the current boundaries of which give an idea of the extent of the Hordern property. The College, including Shubra Hall, the main school building and the Meta Street entrance gates, is now listed on the Register of the National Estate.

From around 1800 to 1860, development in the area was slow with the forests gradually being cleared for orchards and grazing land. The area was a haunt of bushrangers in the 1820s with two major thoroughfares, Parramatta Road to the north and Liverpool Road to the south providing regular opportunities for holdups.

In 1855, the Sydney-Parramatta railway was built through the area which led to a housing boom around the stations at Ashfield and Burwood. This in turn led to local governments forming in the two areas with the land divided roughly equidistant between the two centres. In 1874 a new station was built on the boundary of the two areas and was named Five Dock after another settlement to the north. Because Five Dock was actually a long way north some confusion ensued and Ashfield Council renamed the station in 1876 to Croydon after the suburb in London. The suburb remains divided between the two neighbouring councils to this day.

The first developments were on the northern side of the station around Edwin and Elizabeth Streets. Anthony Hordern built his grand home 'Shubra Hall' in 1869 while many of the shops along Edwin Street North were built in the 1880s. Many houses in the areas surrounding Edwin Street North and Elizabeth St are also of the Victorian style popular in the 1880s and 90s. The 1880s and 90s also saw the establishment of the suburbs first schools with Croydon Public School in 1884, and the Presbyterian Ladies' College relocating from Ashfield in 1891.

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