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Free performance report on all Sale agents

There are 21 real estate agents servicing Sale and surrounds. In 2016 they sold 259 properties. We have analysed all these Sale agents and on request within 24 hours we will send you a free, up-to-date report on their performance, sales track record and what fees you should pay. View report contents

We are the only service in Australia that analyses all local agents and their performance, and provides this to you in a transparent and unbiased manner. View frequently asked questions

We pride ourselves on providing independent, insightful analysis on real estate agents. Read real client case studies to see how we continually exceed expectations. We never disclose your details to any agents unless you specifically instruct us to do so.

Real Estate Agents Sale – 2016/17 Performance

Sale Real Estate Agents sold 259 properties over the last 12 months (215 houses and 44 units). On average these 215 Sale houses took 121 days to sell and were sold at an average discount of -6% from their initial listing price. Sale units on average took 137 days to sell and were sold at an average discount of -9% from their initial listing price.

The best Sale Real Estate Agents sell properties considerably better than these average figures. We detail who these Sale agents are in our free report

Importantly it is the performance of the individual real estate agent rather than the agency used that matters. With over 21 agents operating in the Wellington – Sale council area servicing the Sale market and 8 agencies, vendors should only use those Sale agents who routinely deliver superior results for their clients. This is crucial to maximise their chances of securing the best possible price for their Sale property.

With total house growth of 30% over the last five years Sale agents have had it reasonably easy selling into an appreciating market. Units have fared not as well growing at 7%. Growth in Sale houses over the last year has been below the five year annual growth rate, coming in at -4% for houses (5yr average 6%) and below for units -7% (5yr average 1%).

Request your free report for the individual performance details of real estate agents in Sale and the properties they have sold over the last couple of years.

With Sale houses only selling on average every 10 years and units every 8 years, securing the best Sale real estate agent to manage this infrequent transaction is crucial.

At the end of the day choosing the best Sale real estate agent to sell your property can make years of difference to your personal financial situation.

Suburb Overview

Sale is a city in the Gippsland region of the Australian state of Victoria. It has a population of around 13,336. Sale has seen much redevelopment and development in the past decade one example being the multi-million dollar redevelopment of the city's Port of Sale.

Two famous Gippsland explorers, Paul Strzelecki and Angus McMillan, passed through the immediate area around 1840. The first white settler was Archibald McIntosh who arrived in 1844 and established his 'Flooding Creek' property on the flood plain country which was duly inundated soon after his arrival.

In the 1840s, drovers heading south to Port Albert crossed Flooding Creek and were confronted with the difficult marsh country around the Thomson and Latrobe rivers. A punt operated across the Latrobe River until a toll bridge was erected. A Post Office named Flooding Creek opened here on 30 September 1848 being renamed, somewhat belatedly, as Sale on 1 January 1854.

The first town plots went on sale in 1850. When the new settlement was gazetted in 1851 it was named 'Sale'

The town greatly benefitted from the 1851 gold rush at Omeo as it was situated on the Port Albert to Omeo route and was an important base for the goldfields, until the arrival of the railways. It was also an important service centre for East Gippsland and the Monaro Plains of New South Wales. A building boom took place c. 1855

In 1863 the population of Sale reached 1800 and it became a borough. The courthouse opened the following year. Shops, hotels and offices spilled over into Raymond Street and the first Anglican Church was erected on the site now occupied by St Anne's and Gippsland Grammar School. The Gippsland Times newspaper was established in 1861 while the first Star Hotel and the Criterion Hotel were built in 1865.

In terms of access, the first reasonable road from Melbourne arrived in 1865 and Cobb and Co established a rough-and-ready 24-hour coach service linking Melbourne and Sale. The Latrobe Wharf was built in the 1870s and two hotels emerged to exploit the new centre of activity. It was located near the present swing bridge although little is left.

Anthony Trollope visited Sale in 1872. Writing of the experience in Australia and New Zealand he spoke of the town's 'innumerable hotels' and concluded from his impressions that the Aborigines had little chance of surviving as a race. The children's author Mary Grant Bruce was born in the town in 1878.

A two-storey post office, with clock tower, was built in 1884. HM Prison Sale was completed in 1887 and it operated for 110 years until it was replaced by a private Fulham Correctional Centre. The building has since been demolished, with only part of the large brick fencing still remaining.

Other landmarks in the town include Our Lady of Sion Convent and the Criterion Hotel. The former was designed by architects Reed, Smart and Tappin and built 1892-1901. Assembly halls and dormitory rear wing were added in 1938;the residential wing was added in 1953. The building is listed on the Register of the National Estate. The Criterion Hotel was built in 1865. It originally had a two-storey timber verandah, but this was replaced by a cast iron verandah between 1880 and 1900. It is considered "one of the most impressive hostelries in Victoria" and is listed on the Register of the National Estate. The Criterion Hotel closed in 2006 and its rapidly deteriorating condition caused local concern that it would be demolished. However, the site was subsequently purchased by a Traralgon-based developer who had previous expertise in restoration of commercial buildings. The Criterion received a complete rebuild in 2010/11 with the external heritage facade and verandah fully restored. It will open as a hotel, function venue and restaurant early in 2012.

With the growth of shipping on the local waterways and the Gippsland Lakes schemes emerged to develop Sale as a port. The construction of the Sale Canal duly commenced in the 1880s, thereby linking the town via the Thomson River and the Gippsland Lakes to the open sea. It was completed in 1890. Other elements were the Sale Swing Bridge, completed in 1883, a high wharf, and a launching ramp which still exists in the heart of the city. However, neither the bridge nor the canal created the desired surge of trade and the depression of the 1890s soon engulfed the town. Sale became a town in 1924 and a city in 1950.

Sale VIC 3850
Wurruk VIC 3850