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Free performance report on all Punchbowl agents

There are 93 real estate agents servicing Punchbowl and surrounds. In 2016 they sold 249 properties. We have analysed all these Punchbowl agents and on request within 24 hours we will send you a free, up-to-date report on their performance, sales track record and what fees you should pay. View report contents

We are the only service in Australia that analyses all local agents and their performance, and provides this to you in a transparent and unbiased manner. View frequently asked questions

We pride ourselves on providing independent, insightful analysis on real estate agents. Read real client case studies to see how we continually exceed expectations. We never disclose your details to any agents unless you specifically instruct us to do so.

93 Punchbowl Real Estate Agents Reviewed – Choose The Best

Real Estate Agents Punchbowl – 2016/17 Performance

Punchbowl Real Estate Agents sold 249 properties over the last 12 months (161 houses and 88 units). On average these 161 Punchbowl houses took 95 days to sell and were sold at an average discount of -8% from their initial listing price. Punchbowl units on average took 70 days to sell and were sold at an average discount of -8% from their initial listing price.

The best Punchbowl Real Estate Agents sell properties considerably better than these average figures. We detail who these Punchbowl agents are in our free report

Importantly it is the performance of the individual real estate agent rather than the agency used that matters. With over 93 agents operating in the Canterbury council area servicing the Punchbowl market and 35 agencies, vendors should only use those Punchbowl agents who routinely deliver superior results for their clients. This is crucial to maximise their chances of securing the best possible price for their Punchbowl property.

With total house growth of 27% over the last five years Punchbowl agents have had it reasonably easy selling into an appreciating market. Units have fared not as well growing at 25%. Growth in Punchbowl houses over the last year has been below the five year annual growth rate, coming in at 1% for houses (5yr average 5%) and below for units 4% (5yr average 5%).

Request your free report for the individual performance details of real estate agents in Punchbowl and the properties they have sold over the last couple of years.

With Punchbowl houses only selling on average every 11 years and units every 7 years, securing the best Punchbowl real estate agent to manage this infrequent transaction is crucial.

At the end of the day choosing the best Punchbowl real estate agent to sell your property can make years of difference to your personal financial situation.

Suburb Overview

Punchbowl, a suburb of local government areas City of Bankstown and the City of Canterbury is located 17 kilometres south-west of the Sydney central business district, in the state of New South Wales, Australia, and is a part of the South-western Sydney region.

Punchbowl is named for a circular valley, called 'the punch bowl', which is actually located in the nearby suburb of Belfield at the intersection of Coronation Parade, Georges River and Punchbowl Roads. This feature gave its name to 'Punch Bowl Road' . In the 1830s, an inn built by George Faulkener, close to the corner of Liverpool Road, was called the Punch and Bowl. John Stephens had a property there in the 1830s and his son is mentioned in the Wells Gazetteer in 1848, "Clairville or Punchbowl, in the Parishes of St George and Bankstown, is the property of Sir Alfred Stephens". When a railway station opened on this road in 1909, three kilometres away from the 'punch bowl' itself, the surrounding suburb came to be known as Punchbowl.

In the 1920s and 1930s, Punchbowl was a higher-class suburb, with a number of popular theatres that were closed down or demolished thirty years later. The Punchbowl Astoria opened on 17 July 1935 with seating for 915 persons. The final programme was shown on Wednesday 4 February 1959. The Astoria was eventually gutted and refitted as a three-storey office building. The Punchbowl Regent was situated on the corner of The Boulevarde and Matthews Street. Operated by Enterprise Theatres Ltd, the Regent opened on Saturday 24 May 1923, showing The White Rose. It was a large cinema with seating for 1,287 patrons. The last programme was shown on Wednesday 4 February 1959. The Regent was demolished in August 1964 and replaced by a block of shops.

Punchbowl has a relatively small shopping centre, although the selection is diverse. It thrived until the advent of Roselands and Bankstown Square in the late 1960s and its bisection by the upgrading of Punchbowl Road in the 1970s. It is centred around Punchbowl railway station, along The Boulevarde and Punchbowl Road. Local businesses and clubs reflect the diversity of the population. The largest shop is an IGA Supermarket. Punchbowl RSL was located on The Boulevarde until it closed in 2010 and The Mirage Hotel is on Punchbowl Road. Lebanese cuisine is well regarded in the suburb, to the extent that culinary walking tours of Punchbowl sell out months ahead. There are a number of Lebanese sweet shops in the suburb. In 2009, a gym opened at the Astoria theatre site.

For many years, Jack Walsh International Cycles, on Punchbowl Road, was one of the longest serving shops in Punchbowl. It had been selling and repairing bicycles for over 60 years, until December 2007 when Walsh was unable to continue the business.

Canterbury Road and Punchbowl Road provide the major road links into the suburb. The Boulevarde and South Terrace are also main roads. Punchbowl railway station is located on the Bankstown line of the CityRail network. The line was opened in 1895 and electrified in 1926. Trains take around 25 minutes to Sydenham and 40 minutes to Central station.

The Punchbowl Road railway bridge replaced an old two lane bridge in 1981. The foundations of the old bridge can still be seen west of the current one. The new bridge greatly aided traffic flow through the area but at the cost of effectively cutting the shopping centre in half.

Punchbowl is a mainly residential suburb. Much of the suburb was developed in the late 19th century and early 20th century, especially after the railway line to Bankstown was built. The suburb features a mixture of Federation, Art Deco and contemporary homes. Parts of Punchbowl have been redeveloped since the turn of the 21st century, with flats, townhouses and modern detached houses built.

Punchbowl Public School is located on Canterbury Road. St Charbel's College is located in Highclere Avenue. Saint Jeromes Primary School.

Punchbowl Boys High School in Kelly Street, was established in 1955. The school produced two Australian cricket fast bowlers, Len Pascoe and Jeff Thomson. It has often be described as "the toughest school in Australia".

The first inhabitants of Punchbowl were Aboriginal tribes. The first Europeans in the area were British and Irish settlers in the 19th century. By the mid-20th century, the suburb had absorbed many migrants of Italian and Greek origin. From the mid-1970s, Punchbowl became a very popular location with migrants from Lebanon. During the 1990s immigrants from the former Yugoslavia from countries such as Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia and Serbia settled in the area.

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