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Free performance report on all Maldon agents

There are 3 real estate agents servicing Maldon and surrounds. In 2016 they sold 48 properties. We have analysed all these Maldon agents and on request within 24 hours we will send you a free, up-to-date report on their performance, sales track record and what fees you should pay. View report contents

We are the only service in Australia that analyses all local agents and their performance, and provides this to you in a transparent and unbiased manner. View frequently asked questions

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3 Maldon Real Estate Agents Reviewed – Choose The Best

Real Estate Agents Maldon – 2016/17 Performance

Maldon Real Estate Agents sold 48 houses over the last 12 months. On average these 48 Maldon houses took 116 days to sell and were sold at an average discount of -4% from their initial listing price.

The best Maldon Real Estate Agents sell properties considerably better than these average figures. We detail who these Maldon agents are in our free report.

Importantly it is the performance of the individual real estate agent rather than the agency used that matters. With over 3 agents operating in the Mount Alexander Bal council area servicing the Maldon market and 1 agencies, vendors should only use those Maldon agents who routinely deliver superior results for their clients. This is crucial to maximise their chances of securing the best possible price for their Maldon property.

With total house price growth of 15% over the last five years Maldon agents have had a reasonably difficult market to contend with. Selling properties well in a slow market is much more difficult. Growth in Maldon houses over the last year has been below the five year annual growth rate, coming in at -8% (5yr average 3%).

Request your free report for the individual performance details of real estate agents in Maldon and the properties they have sold over the last couple of years.

With Maldon property transactions only occurring on average every 7 years, securing the best Maldon real estate agent to manage this infrequent transaction is crucial.

At the end of the day choosing the best Maldon real estate agent to sell your property can make years of difference to your personal financial situation.

Suburb Overview

Maldon is a town in Victoria, Australia, in the Shire of Mount Alexander local government area. It has been designated "Australia's first notable town" and is notable for its 19th-century appearance, maintained since gold-rush days. At the 2006 census, Maldon had a population of 1,601.

The district where Maldon now stands was first discovered by white Europeans in 1836, during Major Thomas Mitchell 's famous Victorian expedition. It was settled soon afterwards by pastoralists, and two sheep runs were established in the area, at the foot of Mount Tarrangower. In December 1853, gold was discovered at Cairn Curran, and Maldon became a part of the Victorian Gold Rush.

The goldfield, which was named "Tarrangower Fields" after Mount Tarrangower, immediately attracted an immense number of men eager to make their fortunes at the diggings. Just one month after gold was first discovered, the Chief Commissioner for Goldfields reported 3000 miners had arrived at the diggings. A month after that, a journalist for The Argus reported that the road from Castlemaine to Maldon was lined with the shops of people hoping to make a living of their own from the miners

The road follows up the course of Long Gully, where the diggings were first opened, for a couple of miles, and is lined on either side by an almost continuous row of stores, refreshment tents, eating houses, doctors' tents, apothecaries' shops, and, in fact, shops of every description.

The same report noted that the goldfield's population had already grown to 18,000, though only about 1000 had taken out mining licences.

In 1856 the Victorian government arranged for the settlement to become a town, which was named Maldon. The post office had opened on 14 March 1854.

In 1861, a government census declared the town's population to be 3341, servicing an additional 5,000-6,000 miners at the diggings. At that time it was the eighth-largest town in Victoria, and remained so for the next decade. However, as miners were forced to dig deeper to obtain usable specimens, or as mines ran dry completely, the population began to decline. By 1891, Maldon was reduced to 1,600 inhabitants. Mining of small claims continued through the 20th century, together with sluicing of gullies and tailings. In the 1980s, several new ventures commenced, including an open cut at Union Hill.

Maldon proved to be one of Victoria's richest quartz-mining centres, though with poorer alluvial results than others such as Castlemaine or Ballarat. Quartz mining extended southward through Sandy Creek to Newstead, along to Mia Mia and Muckleford, eastward to Fentimen

The Maldon Vintage Machinery Museum houses stationary engines, farming implements, mining exhibits, fire pumps, and objects with links to Thompsons Foundry, Castlemaine.

Today, Maldon's population is more or less stable at around 1,000 people. The town has changed very little since mining operations ceased, though a former bank at the junction of High and Main Streets has been supplanted by a service station. The town was declared a "notable town" in 1966 by the National Trust of Victoria, who explained that

The township displays overall historical and architectural importance, particularly in its gold town buildings. The significance lies in the variety of building styles, and the area of mining is of interest with one mine still open to the public. Maldon boasts that it is largely unchanged since the 1850s, and has attracted considerable interest from tourists for its 19th-century atmosphere.

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