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Free performance report on all Lane Cove agents

There are 29 real estate agents servicing Lane Cove and surrounds. In 2016 they sold 216 properties. We have analysed all these Lane Cove agents and on request within 24 hours we will send you a free, up-to-date report on their performance, sales track record and what fees you should pay. View report contents

We are the only service in Australia that analyses all local agents and their performance, and provides this to you in a transparent and unbiased manner. View frequently asked questions

We pride ourselves on providing independent, insightful analysis on real estate agents. Read real client case studies to see how we continually exceed expectations. We never disclose your details to any agents unless you specifically instruct us to do so.

Real Estate Agents Lane Cove – 2016/17 Performance

Lane Cove Real Estate Agents sold 216 properties over the last 12 months (76 houses and 140 units). On average these 76 Lane Cove houses took 28 days to sell and were sold at an average discount of -4% from their initial listing price. Lane Cove units on average took 41 days to sell and were sold at an average discount of -5% from their initial listing price.

The best Lane Cove Real Estate Agents sell properties considerably better than these average figures. We detail who these Lane Cove agents are in our free report

Importantly it is the performance of the individual real estate agent rather than the agency used that matters. With over 29 agents operating in the Lane Cove council area servicing the Lane Cove market and 11 agencies, vendors should only use those Lane Cove agents who routinely deliver superior results for their clients. This is crucial to maximise their chances of securing the best possible price for their Lane Cove property.

With total house growth of 21% over the last five years Lane Cove agents have had it reasonably easy selling into an appreciating market. Units have fared not as well growing at 15%. Growth in Lane Cove houses over the last year has been below the five year annual growth rate, coming in at -11% for houses (5yr average 4%) and below for units -4% (5yr average 3%).

Request your free report for the individual performance details of real estate agents in Lane Cove and the properties they have sold over the last couple of years.

With Lane Cove houses only selling on average every 11 years and units every 8 years, securing the best Lane Cove real estate agent to manage this infrequent transaction is crucial.

At the end of the day choosing the best Lane Cove real estate agent to sell your property can make years of difference to your personal financial situation.

Suburb Overview

Lane Cove is a suburb on the lower North Shore of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. Lane Cove is nine kilometres north-west of the Sydney central business district and is the administrative centre for the local government area of the Municipality of Lane Cove. Lane Cove West and Lane Cove North are separate suburbs.

Lane Cove occupies a peninsula on the northern side of Port Jackson , at the opening of the Lane Cove River.

There are a number of possibilities of the origin of the name 'Lane Cove'. The first written use of the name was by Lieutenant William Bradley after he had just sailed along the river in 1788. Some have argued that the it was named after Lieutenant Michael Lane, a respected cartographer, who had once worked with Captain Cook. Others say that it was in honour of John Lane, who was the son of the London Lord Mayor at the time as well as a good friend of the first Governor, Arthur Phillip. In any case, the name stuck, and by the 1800s was being used to refer to all the land north of the river.

Prior to the arrival of the First Fleet, the area in which Lane Cove is situated was inhabited by the Cam-mer-ray-gal Group of the Ku-ring-gai Aboriginal Tribe. The group, which inhabited the north shore of Port Jackson, was one of the largest in the Sydney area.

Lieutenant Ralph Clark was the first European to land, a short distance from the entrance to the Lane Cove River on 14 February 1790. There were land grants in 1794 to some privates and non-commissioned officers in the New South Wales Corps, although few of these grants were actually settled as the steep, timbered land was not particularly habitable. However, Lane Cove was an excellent source for timber and other commodities that the settlers required. During the 19th century, farms and dairies were also established. There were also many industrial and manufacturing factories constructed around Greenwich.

Most of the residential growth in the area however occurred after World War II when returning soldiers were granted blocks of land around Lane Cove. The land value, which was relatively cheap during this time, surged during the 1980s and 1990s when the water views, large suburban blocks, ease of transport and quiet streets became popular.

In 2005, Lane Cove briefly caught the attention of the world's press when part of an apartment block collapsed into an excavation for the Lane Cove Tunnel and a pet bird in the evacuated block was rescued by a robot.

The tram service to Lane Cove opened as an electric line from Crows Nest in February, 1900, with trams connecting with other electric services at Ridge St. It was initially opened as far as Gore Hill and extended to Lane Cove in March, 1909. Some through services operated to and from Milsons Point.

In September 1909, a new line was opened from McMahons Point to Victoria Cross, North Sydney and a new direct route was opened via what is now the Pacific Highway from Victoria Cross to Crows Nest. Services to Lane Cove and Chatswood were altered to operate to and from McMahons Point via the new direct route to Crows Nest, in conjunction with the construction of the Sydney Harbour Bridge.

In March, 1932 the Sydney Harbour Bridge with its associated railway and tramway tracks was opened and services from Lane Cove to the CBD were diverted to operate to and from Wynyard Station via the Sydney Harbour Bridge route. Trams entered Wynyard station via a tunnel entrance at the south-eastern pylon of the bridge.

From Lane Cove a cross regional service to Balmoral was also available. Upon departure from the Lane Cove terminus opposite the council chambers, trams travelled north on Longueville Road turning right onto the Pacific Highway. At Crows Nest, separate lines branched left onto Falcon Street, travelling through Cammeray, Neutral Bay, Cremorne Junction and Mosman before Joining Military Road. The line then split into two separate lines at the intersection of Middle Head Road and Bradleys Head Road. Turning left into Gordon Street off Middle Head Road, the line then entered on to its own off road reservation, crossing several small residential streets as it wound its way down to Henry Plunkett Reserve, entering The Esplanade near the corner of Botanic Road and terminating near Hunters Parade.

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