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Free performance report on all Fitzroy agents

There are 50 real estate agents servicing Fitzroy and surrounds. In 2016 they sold 175 properties. We have analysed all these Fitzroy agents and on request within 24 hours we will send you a free, up-to-date report on their performance, sales track record and what fees you should pay. View report contents

We are the only service in Australia that analyses all local agents and their performance, and provides this to you in a transparent and unbiased manner. View frequently asked questions

We pride ourselves on providing independent, insightful analysis on real estate agents. Read real client case studies to see how we continually exceed expectations. We never disclose your details to any agents unless you specifically instruct us to do so.

50 Fitzroy Real Estate Agents Reviewed – Choose The Best

Real Estate Agents Fitzroy – 2016/17 Performance

Fitzroy Real Estate Agents sold 175 properties over the last 12 months (74 houses and 101 units). On average these 74 Fitzroy houses took 42 days to sell and were sold at an average discount of -11% from their initial listing price. Fitzroy units on average took 61 days to sell and were sold at an average discount of -10% from their initial listing price.

The best Fitzroy Real Estate Agents sell properties considerably better than these average figures. We detail who these Fitzroy agents are in our free report

Importantly it is the performance of the individual real estate agent rather than the agency used that matters. With over 50 agents operating in the Yarra – North council area servicing the Fitzroy market and 19 agencies, vendors should only use those Fitzroy agents who routinely deliver superior results for their clients. This is crucial to maximise their chances of securing the best possible price for their Fitzroy property.

With total house growth of 40% over the last five years Fitzroy agents have had it reasonably easy selling into an appreciating market. Units have fared not as well growing at 38%. Growth in Fitzroy houses over the last year has been below the five year annual growth rate, coming in at 0% for houses (5yr average 8%) and below for units -9% (5yr average 8%).

Request your free report for the individual performance details of real estate agents in Fitzroy and the properties they have sold over the last couple of years.

With Fitzroy houses only selling on average every 12 years and units every 7 years, securing the best Fitzroy real estate agent to manage this infrequent transaction is crucial.

At the end of the day choosing the best Fitzroy real estate agent to sell your property can make years of difference to your personal financial situation.

Suburb Overview

Fitzroy is a suburb of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, 2 km north-east from Melbourne's Central Business District. Its Local Government Area is the City of Yarra. At the 2011 Census, Fitzroy had a population of 9,430.

Planned as Melbourne's first suburb, it was later also one of the city's first areas to gain municipal status. Its borders are Alexandra Parade, Victoria Parade, Smith Street and Nicholson Street. Fitzroy is also Melbourne's smallest suburb in terms of area, being approximately 100 Ha.

It has a long associations with the working class and is currently inhabited by a wide variety of ethnicities and socio-economic groups and is known for a culture of bohemianism, being the main home of Melbourne's Fringe Festival. Its commercial heart is Brunswick Street, which is one of Melbourne's major retail, eating, and entertainment strips.

It has undergone waves of both urban renewal and gentrification since the 1950s. In response to past planning practices, much of the suburb is now a historic preservation precinct, with many individual buildings and streetscapes covered by Heritage Overlays. Its built environment is diverse and features some of the finest examples of Victorian era architecture in Melbourne. The most recent changes to Fitzroy are mandated by the Melbourne 2030 Metropolitan Strategy, in which both Brunswick Street and nearby Smith Street are designated for redevelopment as Activity Centres.

It was named after Sir Charles Augustus FitzRoy, the Governor of New South Wales from 1846 to 1855.

Fitzroy was Melbourne's first suburb, created in 1839 when the area between Melbourne and Alexandra Parade was subdivided into vacant lots and offered for sale.

Newtown was later renamed Collingwood, and the area now called Fitzroy was made a ward of the Melbourne City Council. On 10 September 1858, Fitzroy became a municipality in its own right, separate from the City of Melbourne. Surrounded as it was by a large number of factories and industrial sites in the adjoining suburbs, Fitzroy was ideally suited to working men's housing, and from the 1860s to the 1880s, Fitzroy's working class population rose dramatically. The area's former mansions became boarding houses and slums, and the heightened poverty of the area prompted the establishment of several charitable, religious and philanthropic organisations in the area over the next few decades. A notable local entrepreneur was Macpherson Robertson, whose confectionery factories engulfed several blocks and stand as heritage landmarks today.

The establishment of the Housing Commission of Victoria in 1938 saw swathes of new residences being constructed in Melbourne's outer suburbs. With many of Fitzroy's residents moving to the new accommodation, their places were taken by post-war immigrants, mostly from Italy and Macedonia and the influx of Italian and Irish immigrants saw a marked shift towards Catholicism from Fitzroy's traditional Methodist and Presbyterian roots. The Housing Commission would build two public housing estates in Fitzroy in the 1960s, one in Hanover Street and one at the southern end of Brunswick Street.

Before World War I, Fitzroy was a working-class neighborhood, with a concentration of political radicals already living there. Postwar immigration into the suburb resulted in the area becoming socially diverse. Many working-class Chinese immigrants also settled in Fitzroy due to its proximity to Chinatown, with also a noticeable Vietnamese community, a small enclave of Africans lives there, and the area serves as a centre of Melbourne's Hispanic community, with many Spanish and Latin American-themed restaurants, clubs, bars and some stores.

Like other inner-city suburbs of Melbourne, Fitzroy underwent a process of gentrification during the 1980s and 1990s. The area's manufacturing and warehouse sites were converted into apartments, and the corresponding rising rents in Fitzroy saw many of the area's residents move to Northcote and Brunswick. In June 1994, the City of Yarra was created, by combining the Cities of Fitzroy, Collingwood and Richmond.

Fitzroy's topography is flat. It is laid out in grid plan and is characterised by a fairly tightly spaced rectangular grid of medium-sized streets, with many of its narrow streets and back lanes facilitating only one-way traffic. Its built form is a legacy of its early history when a mixture of land uses was allowed to develop close to each other, producing a great diversity of types and scales of building.

Fitzroy North VIC 3068
Collingwood VIC 3066
Carlton North VIC 3054
Princes Hill VIC 3054
Collingwood North VIC 3066
Abbotsford VIC 3067
Clifton Hill VIC 3068
Fitzroy VIC 3065