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Free performance report on all Dubbo agents

There are 27 real estate agents servicing Dubbo and surrounds. In 2016 they sold 641 properties. We have analysed all these Dubbo agents and on request within 24 hours we will send you a free, up-to-date report on their performance, sales track record and what fees you should pay. View report contents

We are the only service in Australia that analyses all local agents and their performance, and provides this to you in a transparent and unbiased manner. View frequently asked questions

We pride ourselves on providing independent, insightful analysis on real estate agents. Read real client case studies to see how we continually exceed expectations. We never disclose your details to any agents unless you specifically instruct us to do so.

27 Dubbo Real Estate Agents Reviewed – Choose The Best

Real Estate Agents Dubbo – 2016/17 Performance

Dubbo Real Estate Agents sold 641 properties over the last 12 months (594 houses and 47 units). On average these 594 Dubbo houses took 95 days to sell and were sold at an average discount of -6% from their initial listing price. Dubbo units on average took 64 days to sell and were sold at an average discount of -7% from their initial listing price.

The best Dubbo Real Estate Agents sell properties considerably better than these average figures. We detail who these Dubbo agents are in our free report

Importantly it is the performance of the individual real estate agent rather than the agency used that matters. With over 27 agents operating in the Dubbo council area servicing the Dubbo market and 10 agencies, vendors should only use those Dubbo agents who routinely deliver superior results for their clients. This is crucial to maximise their chances of securing the best possible price for their Dubbo property.

With total house growth of 16% over the last five years Dubbo agents have had a reasonably difficult market to contend with. Selling properties well in a slow market is much more difficult. Units have fared better growing at 27%. Growth in Dubbo houses over the last year has been below the five year annual growth rate, coming in at -2% for houses (5yr average 3%) and above for units 19% (5yr average 5%).

Request your free report for the individual performance details of real estate agents in Dubbo and the properties they have sold over the last couple of years.

With Dubbo houses only selling on average every 9 years and units every 7 years, securing the best Dubbo real estate agent to manage this infrequent transaction is crucial.

At the end of the day choosing the best Dubbo real estate agent to sell your property can make years of difference to your personal financial situation.

Suburb Overview

Dubbo is a city in the Orana Region of New South Wales, Australia. It is the largest population centre in the Orana region, with a population of 32,327 and serves an estimated catchment of 130,000.

It is located at the intersection of the Mitchell, Newell and Golden highways. Dubbo is located approximately 275 m above sea level, 303 km north-west of the state capital Sydney and is a major road and rail freight hub to other parts of New South Wales. Dubbo is considered the cross-roads of New South Wales. It is linked by national highways north to Brisbane, south to Melbourne, east to Sydney and Newcastle, and west to Broken Hill and Adelaide.

Dubbo is included in the rainfall records and weather forecast region for the Central West Slopes and in the Central West Slopes and Plains division of the Bureau of Meteorology forecasts.

Evidence of habitation by Indigenous Australians dates back approximately 40,000 years.

The explorer, John Oxley, was the first European to report on the area now known as Dubbo in 1818. The first permanent settler in the area was Robert Dulhunty, described as one of the wealthiest citizens in the Australian colony at the time. There are records of squatters being given permission to set up large sheep and cattle stations in the area in 1824 but these were not maintained. Dulhunty occupied a property, known as Dubbo station , from the early 1830s on a squatting basis. With the passing of the Squatting Act in 1836 he took out a licence on the property.

Dulhunty showed an affinity with Indigenous Australians, his party included some 40 Aborigines and he favoured using Aboriginal names for properties, including Dubbo. Dubbo is now thought to be a mispronunciation of the local Wiradjuri word "Thubbo" but because of a lack of precise records from Dulhunty at the time and an incomplete knowledge of the Wiradjuri language today there is some conjecture over the word's meaning. A popular current theory is the word means "red earth," consistent with the local landscape. It is also possible that Thubbo or Tubbo is Wiradjuri for "head covering"

Dundullimal Homestead is a farmhouse from that period, built around 1840 by John Maugham on his 26,000-acre sheep station. The building is one of the oldest homesteads still standing in western NSW and today is open to visitors.

In 1846, due to the number of settlers in the area, the government decided to establish a courthouse, police station and lock-up in the Dubbo area. A constables residence was completed in 1847 and a wooden slab construction courthouse and lock-up in early 1848. By this time, the settlement had only four buildings;the constables residence, courthouse and lock-up, a store and an inn.

Due to the lack of title for the land, in 1848 the storekeeper, Jean Emile Serisier, organised a petition asking for a land sale of town allotments. The plan was presented to the colony's Surveyor General in May 1849 by surveyor G. Boyle White. The settlement was gazetted as a village in November 1849 with the first land sales taking place in 1850. Population growth was slow until the Victorian gold rush of the 1860s brought an increase in north-south trade. The first bank was opened in 1867. Steady population growth saw the town proclaimed a municipality in 1872, when its population was 850. The railway extension of the main western railway from Wellington to Dubbo was formally opened on 1 February 1881. By 1897, Dubbo had a general store, Carrier Arms, a slab courthouse, a gaol and a police hut. The final section of the Molong to Dubbo railway opened in late May 1925.

The city's largest employer is the Fletcher International Exports, which exports lamb to the world. Other local industries reflect the city's status as a regional base in an area whose economic backbone is agricultural.

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