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Free performance report on all Cessnock agents

There are 40 real estate agents servicing Cessnock and surrounds. In 2016 they sold 278 properties. We have analysed all these Cessnock agents and on request within 24 hours we will send you a free, up-to-date report on their performance, sales track record and what fees you should pay. View report contents

We are the only service in Australia that analyses all local agents and their performance, and provides this to you in a transparent and unbiased manner. View frequently asked questions

We pride ourselves on providing independent, insightful analysis on real estate agents. Read real client case studies to see how we continually exceed expectations. We never disclose your details to any agents unless you specifically instruct us to do so.

40 Cessnock Real Estate Agents Reviewed – Choose The Best

Real Estate Agents Cessnock – 2016/17 Performance

Cessnock Real Estate Agents sold 278 properties over the last 12 months (250 houses and 28 units). On average these 250 Cessnock houses took 100 days to sell and were sold at an average discount of -7% from their initial listing price.

The best Cessnock Real Estate Agents sell properties considerably better than these average figures. We detail who these Cessnock agents are in our free report

Importantly it is the performance of the individual real estate agent rather than the agency used that matters. With over 40 agents operating in the Cessnock council area servicing the Cessnock market and 15 agencies, vendors should only use those Cessnock agents who routinely deliver superior results for their clients. This is crucial to maximise their chances of securing the best possible price for their Cessnock property.

With total house growth of 19% over the last five years Cessnock agents have had a reasonably difficult market to contend with. Selling properties well in a slow market is much more difficult. Units have fared not as well growing at 10%. Growth in Cessnock houses over the last year has been above the five year annual growth rate, coming in at for houses (5yr average 4%) and below for units -10% (5yr average 2%).

Request your free report for the individual performance details of real estate agents in Cessnock and the properties they have sold over the last couple of years.

With Cessnock houses only selling on average every 9 years and units every 10 years, securing the best Cessnock real estate agent to manage this infrequent transaction is crucial.

At the end of the day choosing the best Cessnock real estate agent to sell your property can make years of difference to your personal financial situation.

Suburb Overview

Cessnock is a city in the Hunter Region of New South Wales, Australia, about 52 km by road west of Newcastle. It is the administrative centre of the Cessnock City Council LGA and was named after an 1826 grant of land called Cessnock Estate, which was owned by John Campbell. The local area once known as "The Coalfields" is now the gateway city to the vineyards of the Hunter Valley, which includes Pokolbin, Mount View, Broke, Rothbury, and Branxton.

The town is located in the rich alluvial and volcanic soils of the Hunter Valley. Rich coal seams underlie much of the area. The Brokenback Range rises to the west of the city. The Hunter River flows down the Hunter Valley approximately 20 km to the north. Cessnock lies within the Hunter Valley Important Bird Area.

The transition to wine service centre from a once prosperous mining town has been a long and at times difficult process.

Cessnock lies between Australia

Pastoralists commenced settling the land in the 1820s. Cessnock was named by Scottish settler John Campbell, after his grandfather's baronial Cessnock Castle in Ayrshire to reflect the aristocratic heritage and ambitions for this estate. The township of Cessnock developed from 1850, as a service centre at the junction of the Great North Road from Sydney to the Hunter Valley, with branches to Maitland and Singleton. During the 1860s, land settlement was extensive between Nulkaba and Pokolbin, with wheat, tobacco and grapes the principal crops.

The establishment of the South Maitland coalfields generated extensive land settlement between 1903 and 1923. The current pattern of urban development, transport routes and industrial landscape was laid at this time. The surveying of the Greta coal seam by Professor Edgeworth David around 1888 became the impetus for considerable social and economic change in the area with the development of the coal mining industry.

Whilst mining was the principal industrial base and source of employment in the Cessnock area for the first half of the 20th century, a slump which commenced about 1960 forced the closure of many mines. Subsequent changes to the mining industry, including automation and the introduction of sophisticated computerised equipment, led to the closure of the vast majority of the remaining mines in the area. This has resulted in a decline in population in many villages and townships over the last twenty years which has led to the closure of some schools, shops and community meeting places. Consequently, many areas have undergone a change in character, with rural residential housing developments becoming popular, as well as small cottages and farms used principally as weekend retreats.

The decline of mining on the South Maitland Coalfields has been paralleled by growth in the wine industry and better access to other employment centres.

The Hunter Valley wine-growing area near Cessnock is Australia's oldest wine region and one of the most famous, with around 1,800 hectares under vine. The vineyards of Pokolbin, Mount View and Allandale, with their rich volcanic soils tended by entrepreneurial vignerons, are also the focus of a thriving and growing tourism industry. The extension and eventual completion of the F3 Freeway, created a property and tourism boom during the 1990s.

Cessnock has begun to develop other tourist ventures beyond the wine industry such as championship golf courses, hot air ballooning, sky-diving, and guest house accommodation.

The city council has actively pursued a policy of urban renewal in the city centre since 2001. The local council was one of the first to introduce a recycling program for waste disposal in the state.

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Kitchener NSW 2325
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