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Free performance report on all Campbelltown agents

There are 40 real estate agents servicing Campbelltown and surrounds. In 2016 they sold 293 properties. We have analysed all these Campbelltown agents and on request within 24 hours we will send you a free, up-to-date report on their performance, sales track record and what fees you should pay. View report contents

We are the only service in Australia that analyses all local agents and their performance, and provides this to you in a transparent and unbiased manner. View frequently asked questions

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Real Estate Agents Campbelltown – 2016/17 Performance

Campbelltown Real Estate Agents sold 293 properties over the last 12 months (136 houses and 157 units). On average these 136 Campbelltown houses took 71 days to sell and were sold at an average discount of -6% from their initial listing price. Campbelltown units on average took 55 days to sell and were sold at an average discount of -6% from their initial listing price.

The best Campbelltown Real Estate Agents sell properties considerably better than these average figures. We detail who these Campbelltown agents are in our free report

Importantly it is the performance of the individual real estate agent rather than the agency used that matters. With over 40 agents operating in the Campbelltown – South council area servicing the Campbelltown market and 15 agencies, vendors should only use those Campbelltown agents who routinely deliver superior results for their clients. This is crucial to maximise their chances of securing the best possible price for their Campbelltown property.

With total house growth of 13% over the last five years Campbelltown agents have had a reasonably difficult market to contend with. Selling properties well in a slow market is much more difficult. Units have fared better growing at 40%. Growth in Campbelltown houses over the last year has been above the five year annual growth rate, coming in at 3% for houses (5yr average 3%) and below for units -6% (5yr average 8%).

Request your free report for the individual performance details of real estate agents in Campbelltown and the properties they have sold over the last couple of years.

With Campbelltown houses only selling on average every 8 years and units every 6 years, securing the best Campbelltown real estate agent to manage this infrequent transaction is crucial.

At the end of the day choosing the best Campbelltown real estate agent to sell your property can make years of difference to your personal financial situation.

Suburb Overview

Campbelltown is a suburb in south-western Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. Campbelltown is located 51 kilometres south-west of the Sydney central business district and is the administrative centre for the local government area of the City of Campbelltown.

Campbelltown gets its name from Elizabeth Campbell , the wife of former Governor of New South Wales Lachlan Macquarie. Originally called Campbell-Town, the name was later simplified to the current Campbelltown.

The area that later became Campbelltown was inhabited prior to European settlement by the Tharawal people. Not long after the arrival of the First Fleet in Sydney in 1788, a small herd of six cattle escaped and weren't seen again by the British settlers for seven years. They were spotted, however, by the Tharawal people. In a rock art site called Bull Cave near Campbelltown, they drew a number of cattle with pronounced horns. The Tharawal described the cattle to British explorers and in 1795 the British found a herd of around 60 cattle grazing in the area now known as Camden.

The colonial administration was keen for the herd to establish itself so forbade killing of the cattle or settlement in the area. But John Macarthur, who wanted to establish sheep in the colony, took a liking to the prime grazing land. He convinced the British government to overrule the local administration and grant him 5,000 acres just south of the Nepean River in 1805. Four years later a number of other grants were made to farmers between Camden and Liverpool.

The Tharawal initially worked with the local farmers but a drought in 1814 led to large numbers of neighbouring Gandangara people moving into the area in search of food. Tensions developed between the British and the Gandangara leading to skirmishes and a number of deaths on each side. Governor Macquarie felt a permanent settlement would lead to order in the area and so Campbell-Town was born in 1820.

Development of the town was slow at first, particularly after the departure of Macquarie, and it wasn't until 1831 that residents took possession of town land. However, it was during this period that Campbelltown's most famous incident occurred. In 1826, local farmer Frederick Fisher disappeared. According to folklore, his ghost appeared sitting on a fence rail over a creek just south of the town and pointed to a site where his body was later found to be buried. In memory of the incident, the Fisher's Ghost festival is held each November in Campbelltown.

Campbelltown's population increased steadily in the decades following. The southern rail line was extended to Campbelltown in 1858, leading to further development, and in 1882, Campbelltown Council was established allowing municipal works to occur in earnest. Campbelltown became the first country town in New South Wales to have piped water in 1888 and in the period between the World Wars, a local power station was built to supply electricity to residents.

Campbelltown was designated in the early 1960s as a satellite city by the New South Wales Planning Authority, and a regional capital for the south west of Sydney. There was extensive building and population growth in the intervening time and the government set aside land surrounding the township for public and private housing and industry.

The old town centre, as laid down by Macquarie, is still the main commercial area and includes the Queen Street shopping strip, Campbelltown Mall, Campbelltown railway station and bus interchange, the council chambers and a number of historic buildings. The main residential area is to the south and east of the town centre. On the northwestern side of the railway line is an industrial area.

To the southwest is a second commercial area based around Macarthur railway station which includes the University of Western Sydney and Macarthur Square, a large shopping mall. It features an outdoor entertainment and restaurant precinct known as "Kellicar Lane" which opened after the most recent expansion in November 2005. It features a food court that has large glass windows that look over Kellicar Lane, Campbelltown and the surrounding countryside.

The following buildings in central Campbelltown are listed on the Register of the National Estate.

Ruse NSW 2560
Glen Alpine NSW 2560
Woodbine NSW 2560
Englorie Park NSW 2560
Leumeah NSW 2560
Rosemeadow NSW 2560
Macarthur Square NSW 2560
Blair Athol NSW 2560
Campbelltown NSW 2560
Campbelltown North NSW 2560
Wedderburn NSW 2560
Ambarvale NSW 2560
Kentlyn NSW 2560
St Helens Park NSW 2560
Airds NSW 2560
Menangle Park NSW 2563
Gilead NSW 2560
Bradbury NSW 2560