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Free performance report on all Blacktown agents

There are 72 real estate agents servicing Blacktown and surrounds. In 2016 they sold 863 properties. We have analysed all these Blacktown agents and on request within 24 hours we will send you a free, up-to-date report on their performance, sales track record and what fees you should pay. View report contents

We are the only service in Australia that analyses all local agents and their performance, and provides this to you in a transparent and unbiased manner. View frequently asked questions

We pride ourselves on providing independent, insightful analysis on real estate agents. Read real client case studies to see how we continually exceed expectations. We never disclose your details to any agents unless you specifically instruct us to do so.

72 Blacktown Real Estate Agents Reviewed – Choose The Best

Real Estate Agents Blacktown – 2016/17 Performance

Blacktown Real Estate Agents sold 863 properties over the last 12 months (506 houses and 357 units). On average these 506 Blacktown houses took 73 days to sell and were sold at an average discount of -7% from their initial listing price. Blacktown units on average took 74 days to sell and were sold at an average discount of -6% from their initial listing price.

The best Blacktown Real Estate Agents sell properties considerably better than these average figures. We detail who these Blacktown agents are in our free report

Importantly it is the performance of the individual real estate agent rather than the agency used that matters. With over 72 agents operating in the Blacktown – South-East council area servicing the Blacktown market and 27 agencies, vendors should only use those Blacktown agents who routinely deliver superior results for their clients. This is crucial to maximise their chances of securing the best possible price for their Blacktown property.

With total house growth of 20% over the last five years Blacktown agents have had a reasonably difficult market to contend with. Selling properties well in a slow market is much more difficult. Units have fared not as well growing at 9%. Growth in Blacktown houses over the last year has been below the five year annual growth rate, coming in at 1% for houses (5yr average 4%) and below for units 2% (5yr average 2%).

Request your free report for the individual performance details of real estate agents in Blacktown and the properties they have sold over the last couple of years.

With Blacktown houses only selling on average every 9 years and units every 7 years, securing the best Blacktown real estate agent to manage this infrequent transaction is crucial.

At the end of the day choosing the best Blacktown real estate agent to sell your property can make years of difference to your personal financial situation.

Suburb Overview

Blacktown is a suburb in the City of Blacktown, in Western Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. Blacktown is located 34 kilometres west of the Sydney central business district and is the administrative centre of the local government area of City of Blacktown. Blacktown is the largest of any suburb or township in New South Wales and is one of the most multicultural places in Sydney.

Prior to the arrival of the First Fleet in 1788, Blacktown was inhabited by different groups of the Darug people including the Warmuli, based around what is now Prospect, and their neighbours the Gomerigal from the South Creek area and the Wawarawarry from the Eastern Creek area. It is estimated that fifty to ninety percent of the Darug died of smallpox and other introduced diseases within a few years of the British arrival. Governor Arthur Phillip began granting land in the area to white settlers in 1791, a process that was reversed slightly in 1819 when Governor Lachlan Macquarie granted land to two indigenous men, Colebee and Nurragingy.

A few years later in 1823, the Native Institution was moved from Parramatta to the site where Richmond Road meets Rooty Hill Road North . Although the institution closed in 1833, the road heading out to it became known as the Black Town Road. In 1860 the Railway Department gave the name of Black Town Road Station to the railway station at the junction of the railway and the Black Town Road, with the name shortening to Blacktown by 1862.

The arrival of the railway led to the formation of a town around the station. A post office was opened in 1862 and a school in 1877. In 1906, the Shire of Blacktown was formed and in 1930, electricity was introduced to the town. The population in 1933 was then around 13,000. In the 1950s and 60s, there was a large amount of suburban development both in the current suburb of Blacktown and the new suburbs that sprung up around it. This led to civic development in the town centre with the hospital opening in 1965, the courthouse and police station in 1966, the library in 1967 and the TAFE college in 1969. In 1973, the Westpoint shopping centre opened which was soon followed by the cinema complex.

Blacktown is notoriously known as the site of the vicious murder of Anita Cobby. A park in Blacktown is named after her, nearby the site in which she was last seen alive.

The Blacktown Commercial Business District is located close to Blacktown railway station. Westpoint Blacktown is a major shopping centre and there are a number of small shops, restaurants and hotels in the surrounding area. Westpoint also houses a western suburb television studio of the Nine Network. The Blacktown CBD features the following landmarks

A notable Blacktown retailer in the 1950s was Frank Lowy who conducted a delicatessen and small goods shop in Main Street.

According to the 2006 census, the most common way of getting to work from Blacktown was by car with public transport used by just under twenty percent. Most public transport was done by train with five percent catching buses for all or part of their journey. Blacktown railway station is on the Western Line of the CityRail network. A major bus interchange is located next to the station and an underground bus station is at the entrance to Westpoint. Blacktown is a terminus of the North-West T-way.

Busways provides services North , west and south , whilst Hillsbus provides services east of Blacktown.

The first school in the area was opened in 1877. While no longer in use as a school, the heritage listed building in Flushcombe Road is now used as a Visitor Information Centre. There are, however, a large number of schools in the suburb. Government run primary schools in the area include: Blacktown North Public School, Blacktown South Public School, Blacktown West Public School, Lynwood Park Public School, Marayong South Public School, Shelley Public School, and Walters Road Public School. Public high schools include: Blacktown Boys High School, Blacktown Girls High School, Evans High School and Mitchell High School. There is also the Coreen School, which caters to older children with learning difficulties.

There are two Catholic primary schools, St Michaels Primary School and St Patricks Primary School, and two Catholic high schools, Nagle College for girls and Patrician Brothers' College Blacktown for boys. Tyndale Christian School is a private school covering children from kindergarten to year 12.

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