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Free performance report on all Bankstown agents

There are 56 real estate agents servicing Bankstown and surrounds. In 2016 they sold 595 properties. We have analysed all these Bankstown agents and on request within 24 hours we will send you a free, up-to-date report on their performance, sales track record and what fees you should pay. View report contents

We are the only service in Australia that analyses all local agents and their performance, and provides this to you in a transparent and unbiased manner. View frequently asked questions

We pride ourselves on providing independent, insightful analysis on real estate agents. Read real client case studies to see how we continually exceed expectations. We never disclose your details to any agents unless you specifically instruct us to do so.

Real Estate Agents Bankstown – 2016/17 Performance

Bankstown Real Estate Agents sold 595 properties over the last 12 months (161 houses and 434 units). On average these 161 Bankstown houses took 79 days to sell and were sold at an average discount of -9% from their initial listing price. Bankstown units on average took 59 days to sell and were sold at an average discount of -6% from their initial listing price.

The best Bankstown Real Estate Agents sell properties considerably better than these average figures. We detail who these Bankstown agents are in our free report

Importantly it is the performance of the individual real estate agent rather than the agency used that matters. With over 56 agents operating in the Bankstown – North-East council area servicing the Bankstown market and 21 agencies, vendors should only use those Bankstown agents who routinely deliver superior results for their clients. This is crucial to maximise their chances of securing the best possible price for their Bankstown property.

With total house growth of 26% over the last five years Bankstown agents have had it reasonably easy selling into an appreciating market. Units have fared better growing at 29%. Growth in Bankstown houses over the last year has been below the five year annual growth rate, coming in at 2% for houses (5yr average 5%) and below for units 4% (5yr average 6%).

Request your free report for the individual performance details of real estate agents in Bankstown and the properties they have sold over the last couple of years.

With Bankstown houses only selling on average every 8 years and units every 7 years, securing the best Bankstown real estate agent to manage this infrequent transaction is crucial.

At the end of the day choosing the best Bankstown real estate agent to sell your property can make years of difference to your personal financial situation.

Suburb Overview

Bankstown is a suburb of south-western Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. Bankstown is located 20 kilometres south-west of the Sydney central business district and is the administrative centre of the local government area of the City of Bankstown.

Prior to European settlement, Cumberland Plains Woodland occupied much of the area. Turpentine ironbark forest covered much of what is now Bankstown. The land was occupied by the Bediagal people. Their land bordered the Dharawal and the Darung people. The Aboriginal inhabitants strongly opposed the European settlers. The resistance ceased after a number of their leaders were killed or imprisoned in 1816. In that year an epidemic broke out amongst the native people which reduced the Aboriginal populations, this also contributed to the end of their resistance.

In 1795, Matthew Flinders and George Bass explored up the Georges River for about 20 miles beyond what had been previously surveyed, and reported favourably to Governor Hunter of the land on its banks. Hunter examined the country himself, and established one of the pioneer colonies there, called Bank's Town, today written as one word Bankstown.

Hunter named it in honour of botanist Sir Joseph Banks, who travelled to Australia with Captain James Cook in 1770. The area of first European settlement along the river has been partially preserved as part of the Mirambeena Regional Park. The Bankstown City area includes large areas of the Georges River National Park.

One hundred years after its naming, Bankstown was proclaimed a municipal district on 9 September 1895. At this time there was a feeling of impending growth which was further strengthened by the promise of increased railway extensions. Municipalities that were already constituted became ambitious, and, in 1894, both Enfield and Auburn Councils announced their intention to absorb Bankstown as part of their own municipalities. However, a petition was organised and signed by 300 residents resulting in Bankstown retaining its individual status. And on 9 September 1895 it was proclaimed a municipal district. The first election was held on 2 November 1895. With 884 electors on the roll, 112 people voted to cast a total of 213 votes. Each ratepayer was entitled to 1.4 votes according to the assessed value of his property. Women were not allowed to vote at this stage.

The first town hall and Council Chambers were built in 1898 on the northern side of the Hume Highway , near Rookwood Road . The council chambers were relocated to a new building in South Terrace in June 1918. The building still stands and now has a shopping arcade running through it.

Bankstown Council relocated to its third premises in 1963 when the Civic Centre that is located on the corner of Chapel Road and The Mall was constructed. It included the Council Chambers or

On 27 May 1980, during a visit by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, Bankstown was accorded city status.

Bankstown is the seat of major industry including the aviation, engineering and maintenance at Bankstown Airport. Other employers include small industrial operations, the public service and the retail industry. The suburb is affected with unusually high unemployment and is subject to a dedicated income management program specifically targeting the problem.

In 1862 the Church of England School was first opened and was commissioned as a public school in 1867. Bankstown's first public school was built where McLeod Reserve is currently situated in 1880. In 1882 49 boys and 36 girls were enrolled, and upkeep expenses totalled 219 pounds, eight shillings and 11 pence. The school's first headmaster was Dugald McLeod who taught at the school since its opening until 1912. The site of the well used by Bankstown Public is today commemorated by a plaque. The school was demolished in 1924 due to the development of North Bankstown School in the same year. Since then Bankstown has seen the development of several different educational facilities, such as, Al Amanah College, Bankstown Senior College, Bankstown Girls High School, Bankstown Grammar School, LaSalle Catholic College, Bankstown, St Euphemia College, TAFE Bankstown and University of Western Sydney, Bankstown Campus just to name a few.

In 1939 local residents were made privy to the events of World War II. Conscripted residents were required to report for duty at a drill hall on Canterbury Road, Belmore. Camps were set up in and around Canterbury Racecourse and local parks in the district. Residents with foreign names were sent to internment camps as there was growing suspicion about residents with foreign names. A portion of these folk were Australian citizens who served with the Australian armed forces during World War I.

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