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Free performance report on all Albany agents

There are 21 real estate agents servicing Albany and surrounds. In 2016 they sold 24 properties. We have analysed all these Albany agents and on request within 24 hours we will send you a free, up-to-date report on their performance, sales track record and what fees you should pay. View report contents

We are the only service in Australia that analyses all local agents and their performance, and provides this to you in a transparent and unbiased manner. View frequently asked questions

We pride ourselves on providing independent, insightful analysis on real estate agents. Read real client case studies to see how we continually exceed expectations. We never disclose your details to any agents unless you specifically instruct us to do so.

21 Albany Real Estate Agents Reviewed – Choose The Best

Real Estate Agents Albany – 2016/17 Performance

Albany Real Estate Agents sold 24 houses over the last 12 months. On average these 24 Albany houses took 116 days to sell and were sold at an average discount of -16% from their initial listing price.

The best Albany Real Estate Agents sell properties considerably better than these average figures. We detail who these Albany agents are in our free report.

Importantly it is the performance of the individual real estate agent rather than the agency used that matters. With over 21 agents operating in the Albany – Central council area servicing the Albany market and 8 agencies, vendors should only use those Albany agents who routinely deliver superior results for their clients. This is crucial to maximise their chances of securing the best possible price for their Albany property.

With total house price growth of 0% over the last five years Albany agents have had a reasonably difficult market to contend with. Selling properties well in a slow market is much more difficult. Growth in Albany houses over the last year has been below the five year annual growth rate, coming in at -9% (5yr average 0%).

Request your free report for the individual performance details of real estate agents in Albany and the properties they have sold over the last couple of years.

With Albany property transactions only occurring on average every 7 years, securing the best Albany real estate agent to manage this infrequent transaction is crucial.

At the end of the day choosing the best Albany real estate agent to sell your property can make years of difference to your personal financial situation.

Suburb Overview

Albany is a port city in the Great Southern region of Western Australia, some 418 km SE of Perth, the state capital. As of 2009, Albany's population was estimated at 33,600, making it the 6th-largest city in the state.

The city centre is at the northern edge of Princess Royal Harbour, which is a part of King George Sound. The Central Business District is bounded by Mount Clarence to the east and Mount Melville to the west. The city is in the Local Government Area of the City of Albany.

Albany was founded in January 1827 as a military outpost of New South Wales as part of a plan to forestall French ambitions in the region. The area was initially named Frederickstown in honour of Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany. In 1831, the settlement was transferred to the control of the Swan River Colony and renamed Albany by Governor James Stirling.

During the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the town served as a gateway to the Eastern Goldfields and, for many years, it was the colony's only deep-water port, having a place of eminence on shipping services between Britain and its Australian colonies. The construction of Fremantle Harbour in 1893, however, saw its importance as a port decline, after which the town's industries turned primarily to agriculture, timber and, later, whaling. Unlike Perth and Fremantle, Albany was a strong supporter of Federation in 1901.

Today the town is a place of significance as a tourist destination and base from which to explore the South-West of the State and is well regarded for its natural beauty and preservation of heritage. The town has an important, though somewhat controversial, role in the Anzac legend, being the last port of call for troopships departing Australia in the First World War.

Albany is the oldest permanently settled town in Western Australia, predating Perth and Fremantle by some two years.

The Albany region was first home to the Menang Noongar people, who made use of the area during the summer months for fishing and other activities. They called the area Kinjarling which means "the place of rain". Many town names in South-Western Australia end in "up" or "ing", which means "place of" in the Noongar language. Early European explorers discovered evidence of fish traps located on Emu Point and on French, now Kalgan, River and a small "village" of bark dwellings that were, at the time, deserted.

Albany is also the oldest continuous European settlement in Western Australia, founded in 1826, three years before the state capital of Perth. The King George Sound settlement was a hastily dispatched British military outpost, intended to forestall any plans by France for settlements in Western Australia.

The first European explorers to visit the area around Albany were on the Dutch ship Gulden Zeepaert skippered by Fran

In 1791, English explorer George Vancouver explored the south coast including entering and naming King George Sound. Albany was the site at which, on 27 September 1791, Vancouver took possession of New Holland for the British Crown. Vancouver went out of his way to establish good relationships with the local Aboriginal people.

In 1792, Frenchman Bruni d'Entrecasteaux, in charge of the Recherche and L'Esperance, reached Cape Leeuwin on 5 December and explored eastward along the southern coast. The expedition did not enter King George Sound due to bad weather.

Mount Elphinstone WA 6330
Emu Point WA 6330
Orana WA 6330
Lockyer WA 6330
Centennial Park WA 6330
Albany WA 6330
Yakamia WA 6330
Seppings WA 6330
Mount Clarence WA 6330
Port Albany WA 6330
Mount Melville WA 6330
Mira Mar WA 6330
Middleton Beach WA 6330
Spencer Park WA 6330
Collingwood Park WA 6330