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Free performance report on all Williamstown agents

There are 29 real estate agents servicing Williamstown and surrounds. In 2016 they sold 244 properties. We have analysed all these Williamstown agents and on request within 24 hours we will send you a free, up-to-date report on their performance, sales track record and what fees you should pay. View report contents

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Real Estate Agents Williamstown – 2016/17 Performance

Williamstown Real Estate Agents sold 244 properties over the last 12 months (183 houses and 61 units). On average these 183 Williamstown houses took 74 days to sell and were sold at an average discount of -7% from their initial listing price. Williamstown units on average took 74 days to sell and were sold at an average discount of -5% from their initial listing price.

The best Williamstown Real Estate Agents sell properties considerably better than these average figures. We detail who these Williamstown agents are in our free report

Importantly it is the performance of the individual real estate agent rather than the agency used that matters. With over 29 agents operating in the Hobsons Bay – Williamstown council area servicing the Williamstown market and 11 agencies, vendors should only use those Williamstown agents who routinely deliver superior results for their clients. This is crucial to maximise their chances of securing the best possible price for their Williamstown property.

With total house growth of 35% over the last five years Williamstown agents have had it reasonably easy selling into an appreciating market. Units have fared not as well growing at 33%. Growth in Williamstown houses over the last year has been below the five year annual growth rate, coming in at -3% for houses (5yr average 7%) and below for units -7% (5yr average 7%).

Request your free report for the individual performance details of real estate agents in Williamstown and the properties they have sold over the last couple of years.

With Williamstown houses only selling on average every 11 years and units every 10 years, securing the best Williamstown real estate agent to manage this infrequent transaction is crucial.

At the end of the day choosing the best Williamstown real estate agent to sell your property can make years of difference to your personal financial situation.

Suburb Overview

Williamstown is a suburb of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, 8 km south-west from Melbourne's central business district. Its Local Government Area is the City of Hobsons Bay. At the 2011 Census, Williamstown had a population of 13,203.

Williamstown is approximately 15 minutes by car from Melbourne via the West Gate Freeway or a 30-minute train journey from Flinders Street Station. Ferries from Melbourne's Southgate Arts & Leisure Precinct take approximately 1 hour.

Williamstown is also the main town where the Australian Television Program Blue Heelers was filmed.

Aboriginal people occupied the area long before maritime activities shaped the modern historical development of Williamstown. The Yalukit-willam clan of the Kulin nation were the first people to call Hobsons Bay home. They roamed the thin coastal strip from Werribee to Williamstown/Hobsons Bay.

The Yalukit-willam were one clan in a language group known as the Bunurong, which included six clans along the coast from the Werribee River, across the Mornington Peninsula, Western Port Bay to Wilsons Promontory. The region offered a varied diet to its inhabitants. Not only were shell fish available from the sea, but the many swamps and creeks in the district would have yielded birds, fish, eels, eggs and snakes. Early white settlers in the region noted plenty of kangaroos and possums, which would also have been a source of food.

The Yalukit-willam referred to the Williamstown area as "koort-boork-boork", a term meaning "clump of she-oaks ", literally "She-oak, She-oak, many." Around Point Gellibrand people used to be invited to join in ceremony, an indigenous peace festival and food festival where there would be an exchange of water and the leaves of a gum tree as well as feasts of bird meat and fish and shellfish.

The head of the Yalikut-willam tribe at the time of the arrival of the first white settlers was Benbow, who became one of John Batman's guides.

Industrial development, land segregation, racism and a typhoid epidemic saw Aboriginal presence at Point Gellibrand rapidly decline after 1835.

The first European to arrive at the place now known as Williamstown was Acting-Lieutenant Robbins, who explored Point Gellibrand with his survey party in 1803. The mouth of the Yarra River was later inspected in May and June 1835 by a party led by John Batman who recognised the potential of the Melbourne townsite for settlement. The site of what became Williamstown they named Port Harwood, after the captain of one of their ships.

In November 1835, Captain Robson Coltish, master of the barque Norval sailed from Launceston, then crossing Bass Strait with a cargo of 500 sheep and 50 Hereford cattle which had been consigned by Dr. Alexander Thomson. After reaching the coastline of Port Phillip, Captain Coltish chose the area now known as Port Gellibrand, as a suitable place to unload his cargo. Within weeks of the first consignment, a stream of vessels began making their way across Bass Strait. Because of the sheltered harbour, many of these new arrivals decided to settle in the immediate area.

When Governor Richard Bourke and Captain William Lonsdale visited the emergent settlement at Port Phillip in 1837, they both felt the main site of settlement would emerge at the estuary and they renamed it William's Town after King William IV, then the English monarch. It served as Melbourne's first anchorage and as the centre for port facilities to the Port Phillip district until the late 19th century.

Williamstown VIC 3016
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Newport VIC 3015
Williamstown North VIC 3016