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Free performance report on all Surry Hills agents

There are 138 real estate agents servicing Surry Hills and surrounds. In 2016 they sold 420 properties. We have analysed all these Surry Hills agents and on request within 24 hours we will send you a free, up-to-date report on their performance, sales track record and what fees you should pay. View report contents

We are the only service in Australia that analyses all local agents and their performance, and provides this to you in a transparent and unbiased manner. View frequently asked questions

We pride ourselves on providing independent, insightful analysis on real estate agents. Read real client case studies to see how we continually exceed expectations. We never disclose your details to any agents unless you specifically instruct us to do so.

Real Estate Agents Surry Hills – 2016/17 Performance

Surry Hills Real Estate Agents sold 420 properties over the last 12 months (119 houses and 301 units). On average these 119 Surry Hills houses took 60 days to sell and were sold at an average discount of -7% from their initial listing price. Surry Hills units on average took 56 days to sell and were sold at an average discount of -6% from their initial listing price.

The best Surry Hills Real Estate Agents sell properties considerably better than these average figures. We detail who these Surry Hills agents are in our free report

Importantly it is the performance of the individual real estate agent rather than the agency used that matters. With over 138 agents operating in the Sydney – East council area servicing the Surry Hills market and 52 agencies, vendors should only use those Surry Hills agents who routinely deliver superior results for their clients. This is crucial to maximise their chances of securing the best possible price for their Surry Hills property.

With total house growth of 34% over the last five years Surry Hills agents have had it reasonably easy selling into an appreciating market. Units have fared better growing at 37%. Growth in Surry Hills houses over the last year has been below the five year annual growth rate, coming in at -4% for houses (5yr average 7%) and below for units -5% (5yr average 7%).

Request your free report for the individual performance details of real estate agents in Surry Hills and the properties they have sold over the last couple of years.

With Surry Hills houses only selling on average every 10 years and units every 8 years, securing the best Surry Hills real estate agent to manage this infrequent transaction is crucial.

At the end of the day choosing the best Surry Hills real estate agent to sell your property can make years of difference to your personal financial situation.

Suburb Overview

Surry Hills is an inner-city suburb of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. Surry Hills is located immediately south-east of the Sydney central business district in the local government area of the City of Sydney. Surry Hills is surrounded by the suburbs of Darlinghurst to the north, Chippendale and Haymarket to the west, Moore Park and Paddington to the east and Redfern to the south. It is bordered by Elizabeth Street and Chalmers Street to the west, Cleveland Street to the south, South Dowling Street to the east, and Oxford Street to the north.

Central is a locality in the north-west of the suburb around Central Station. Prince Alfred Park is located nearby. Strawberry Hills is a locality around Cleveland and Elizabeth streets.

The first land grants in Surry Hills were made in the 1790s. Major Joseph Foveaux received 105 acres . His property was known as Surry Hills Farm, after the Surrey Hills in Surrey, England. Foveaux Street is named in his honour. Commissary John Palmer received 90 acres . He called the property George Farm and in 1800 Palmer also bought Foveaux's farm. In 1792, the boundaries of the Sydney Cove settlement were established between the head of Cockle Bay to the head of Woolloomooloo Bay. West of the boundary, which included present-day Surry Hills, was considered suitable for farming and was granted to military officers and free settlers.

After Palmer's political failures, his reduced financial circumstances forced the first subdivision and sale of his estate in 1814. Isaac Nichols bought Allotment 20, comprising over 6 acres . Due to the hilly terrain, much of the suburb was considered remote and 'inhospitable'.

In the early years of the nineteenth century the area around what is now Prince Alfred Park was undeveloped land known as the Government Paddocks or Cleveland Paddocks. A few villas were built in the suburb in the late 1820s. The suburb remained one of contrasts for much of the nineteenth century, with the homes of wealthy merchants mixed with that of the commercial and working classes.

In 1820, Governor Macquarie ordered the consecration of the Devonshire Street Cemetery. A brick wall was erected before any interments took place to enclose its 4 acres . Within a four year period the cemetery was expanded by the addition of 7 acres to its south. A road was formed along the southern boundary of the cemetery in the first half of the 1830s and was called Devonshire Street The Devonshire Street cemetery, where many of the early settlers were buried, was later moved to build the Sydney railway terminus. Central railway station was opened on the 4th August 1906. The area around Cleveland and Elizabeth streets was known as Strawberry Hills. Strawberry Hills post office was located at this intersection for many years.

In 1833, the Nichol's estate was subdivided and sold. One purchase was by Thomas Broughton and subsequently acquired by George Hill who constructed Durham Hall on this and adjoining lots. Terrace houses and workers' cottages were built in Surry Hills from the 1850s. Light industry became established in the area, particularly in the rag trade . It became a working class suburb, predominately inhabited by Irish immigrants. The suburb developed a reputation for crime and vices. The famous Sydney underworld figure Kate Leigh , lived in Surry Hills for more than 80 years.

Surry Hills was favoured by newly arrived families after World War II when property values were low and accommodation was inexpensive. From the 1980s, the area was gentrified, with many of the area's older houses and building restored and many new upper middle-class residents enjoying the benefits of inner-city living.

The West Kensington via Surry Hills Line operated from 1881 down Crown St as far as Cleveland St as a steam tramway. It was extended to Phillip St in 1909, Todman Ave in 1912, and then to its final terminus down Todman Ave in 1937. When the line was fully operational it branched from the tramlines in Oxford St and proceeded down Crown St to Cleveland St in Surry Hills, then south along Baptist St to Phillip St, where it swung left into Crescent St before running south along Dowling St. It passed the Dowling St Depot, then tuned left into Todman Avenue, where it terminated at West Kensington. The line along Crown Street closed in 1957, the remainder stayed open until 1961 to allow access to Dowling St Depot. Sydney Buses routes 301, 302 and 303 generally follow the route down Crown and Baptist Sts as far as Phillip St.

Surry Hills has a mixture of residential, commercial and light industrial areas. It remains Sydney's main centre for fashion wholesale activities, particularly on the western side. Crown Street is the heart of the Surry Hills community, featuring a mix of cafes, restaurants, fashion and homewares stores. The Surry Hills Shopping Village is a shopping centre on Cleveland Street, on the border with Redfern. Oxford Square is a shopping centre on Oxford Street, on the border with Darlinghurst. Surry Hills Markets are held in Shannon Reserve at the corner of Crown and Collins Streets, on the first Saturday of every month, and the Surry Hills Festival is an annual community event, attracting tens of thousands of visitors, held in Prince Alfred Park.;The Surry Hills Library and Community Centre sits opposite Shannon Reserve and houses the local branch of the city library and the Surry Hills Neighbourhood Centre. The building was "designed to achieve excellence in sustainable design and set new benchmarks in environmental performance" according to the City of Sydney website.

Central railway station, the largest station on the CityRail network, sits on western edge of Surry Hills. Surry Hills is also serviced by State Transit Authority buses. The Eastern Distributor is a major road, on the eastern edge of the suburb. Major thoroughfares are Crown Street, Cleveland Street, Bourke Street and Foveaux Street. Surry Hills is within easy walking distance of the Sydney CBD, and is included in a widening network of cycleways.

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