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Free performance report on all Hurstville agents

There are 103 real estate agents servicing Hurstville and surrounds. In 2016 they sold 455 properties. We have analysed all these Hurstville agents and on request within 24 hours we will send you a free, up-to-date report on their performance, sales track record and what fees you should pay. View report contents

We are the only service in Australia that analyses all local agents and their performance, and provides this to you in a transparent and unbiased manner. View frequently asked questions

We pride ourselves on providing independent, insightful analysis on real estate agents. Read real client case studies to see how we continually exceed expectations. We never disclose your details to any agents unless you specifically instruct us to do so.

Real Estate Agents Hurstville – 2016/17 Performance

Hurstville Real Estate Agents sold 455 properties over the last 12 months (152 houses and 303 units). On average these 152 Hurstville houses took 79 days to sell and were sold at an average discount of -8% from their initial listing price. Hurstville units on average took 61 days to sell and were sold at an average discount of -7% from their initial listing price.

The best Hurstville Real Estate Agents sell properties considerably better than these average figures. We detail who these Hurstville agents are in our free report

Importantly it is the performance of the individual real estate agent rather than the agency used that matters. With over 103 agents operating in the Hurstville council area servicing the Hurstville market and 39 agencies, vendors should only use those Hurstville agents who routinely deliver superior results for their clients. This is crucial to maximise their chances of securing the best possible price for their Hurstville property.

With total house growth of 47% over the last five years Hurstville agents have had it reasonably easy selling into an appreciating market. Units have fared not as well growing at 36%. Growth in Hurstville houses over the last year has been below the five year annual growth rate, coming in at 6% for houses (5yr average 9%) and below for units 3% (5yr average 7%).

Request your free report for the individual performance details of real estate agents in Hurstville and the properties they have sold over the last couple of years.

With Hurstville houses only selling on average every 7 years and units every 7 years, securing the best Hurstville real estate agent to manage this infrequent transaction is crucial.

At the end of the day choosing the best Hurstville real estate agent to sell your property can make years of difference to your personal financial situation.

Suburb Overview

Hurstville is a suburb in southern Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. Hurstville is located 16 kilometres south of the Sydney central business district and is part of the St George area. Hurstville is the administrative centre of the local government area of the City of Hurstville.

Hurstville has become a central business district for the southern suburbs of Sydney. It is a large, multi-cultural suburb with its development of commercial buildings and high-rise residential buildings dominating the skyline. Hurstville's residential developments are a mixture of low density housing, medium density flats and high density apartment buildings. As a commercial centre, it features branches of many banks, financial institutions, insurance companies and retail shops.

The name "Hurstville" is derived from the English " hurst ", meaning "a wooded eminence", and " ville ", "town".

Although it is unknown when they first settled in the Hurstville area, the first inhabitants were Australian Aborigines. At the time of the arrival of the First Fleet, the Aborigines residing in the area were of the Eora tribe, whose numbers spanned along the Georges River, from Botany Bay to present-day Liverpool.

The land of the Hurstville region was granted by the government of the new colony of New South Wales to two men;Captain John Townson and his brother Robert Townson in 1808. Captain John Townson was granted 1950 acres of land which is now occupied by the suburb of Hurstville and part of Bexley. Robert Townson was granted the land which is now occupied by Penshurst, Mortdale and parts of Peakhurst. In the same year, in the area now known as Riverwood land grants were made to Jane Trotter, Mary Shepley, Charles Doudall, and James Ryan. Later in 1816 another land grant in the same area was given to Mary Redman.

In 1809, Captain John Townson was granted an additional 250 acres in the area now occupied by Kingsgrove and Beverly Hills. The Townson brothers were not happy with the land that they were given because it was not suitable for the farming of sheep for wool and it is likely that the brothers never occupied their land. In 1812, a wealthy merchant named Simeon Lord bought the land of Captain John Townson and named it Lord's Forest. When Lord, died the land became the property of John Rose Holden and James Holt of the Bank of NSW.

A dam with a roadway on top was constructed on the Cooks River at Tempe in 1839. In 1843, the road that was to become known as Forest Road was extended from the dam to a hand-winched punt in Lugarno. On the other side of the river, the road continued all the way to Wollongong;however, it was only suitable for travellers on horseback. The new road opened up the Hurstville region and created a settlement at Bottle Forest, now known as Heathcote.

In 1850, the Lord Forest estate was purchased by Michael Gannon , who subdivided it into small farms along what is now Croydon Road and three larger farms that were purchased by Dent, Peake, and Ibbotson. The area became known as Gannon's Forest. The land originally granted to Robert Townson was purchased by John Connell in 1830 and, following his death in 1849, the estate was inherited by his grandsons, Elias Pearson Laycock and John Connell Laycock.

The Gannon's Forest post office opened in 1881. The local school was named "Hurstville" by School Inspector MacIntyre when it was established in 1876. When the railway station opened on 15 October 1884, it took the name Hurstville, from the school. Hurstville municipality was incorporated in 1887 and, in 1988, Hurstville was declared a city. The Centenary Bakery on Forest Road is a historic building that has been preserved and once housed a museum. The St George Regional Museum is now located in another historic building in MacMahon Street.

The Hurstville train crash on 3 August 1920 resulted in five people killed and fifty injured. It involved the collision of two steam trains, one arriving from Central plunged into the back of the other bound that was stationary at Hurstville railway station, bound for Sutherland.

Hurstville's commercial area is centred around the main street, Forest Road, on the northern side of Hurstville Railway station. The commercial developments also extend to surrounding streets concentrated from Queens Road to The Avenue and on the southern side of Hurstville Railway station, around Ormonde Parade. The commercial developments extend further along Forest Road, west towards Penshurst and east towards Bexley.

Oatley NSW 2223
Lugarno NSW 2210
Hurstville Westfield NSW 2220
Peakhurst NSW 2210
Beverly Hills NSW 2209
Narwee NSW 2209
Kingsway West NSW 2208
Hurstville NSW 2220
Peakhurst Heights NSW 2210
Penshurst NSW 2222
Mortdale NSW 2223