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Kiama Real Estate Agents

Free performance report on all Kiama agents

Kiama Real Estate Agents Report - It's free

There are 27 real estate agents servicing Kiama and surrounds. In 2014 they sold 160 properties. We have analysed all these Kiama agents and on request within 24 hours we will send you a free, up-to-date report on their performance, sales track record and what fees you should pay. View report contents

We are the only service in Australia that analyses all local agents and their performance, and provides this to you in a transparent and unbiased manner. View frequently asked questions

We pride ourselves on providing independent, insightful analysis on real estate agents. Read real client case studies to see how we continually exceed expectations. We never disclose your details to any agents unless you specifically instruct us to do so.

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Kiama Real Estate Agents - As featured in
Kiama Property Market Summary

Real Estate Agents Kiama – 2012/13 Performance

Kiama Real Estate Agents sold 160 properties over the last 12 months (100 houses and 60 units). On average these 100 Kiama houses took 123 days to sell and were sold at an average discount of -10% from their initial listing price. Kiama units on average took 113 days to sell and were sold at an average discount of -9% from their initial listing price.

The best Kiama Real Estate Agents sell properties considerably better than these average figures. We detail who these Kiama agents are in our free report

Importantly it is the performance of the individual real estate agent rather than the agency used that matters. With over 27 agents operating in the Kiama council area servicing the Kiama market and 10 agencies, vendors should only use those Kiama agents who routinely deliver superior results for their clients. This is crucial to maximise their chances of securing the best possible price for their Kiama property.

With total house growth of 22% over the last five years Kiama agents have had it reasonably easy selling into an appreciating market. Units have fared not as well growing at 10%. Growth in Kiama houses over the last year has been below the five year annual growth rate, coming in at 3% for houses (5yr average 4%) and below for units -1% (5yr average 2%).

Request your free report for the individual performance details of real estate agents in Kiama and the properties they have sold over the last couple of years.

With Kiama houses only selling on average every 8 years and units every 7 years, securing the best Kiama real estate agent to manage this infrequent transaction is crucial.

At the end of the day choosing the best Kiama real estate agent to sell your property can make years of difference to your personal financial situation.

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Suburb Overview

Kiama is a township 120 kilometres south of Sydney in the Illawarra, New South Wales, Australia in the Municipality of Kiama. At the 2006 census, Kiama had a population of 12,286 people. One of the main tourist attractions is the Kiama Blowhole. The seaside town features several popular surfing beaches, caravan parks and numerous alfresco cafes and restaurants. It is the first country town south of Sydney, and attracts a large number of day trippers.

Kiama was the site of two strong volcanic flows, called the Gerringong Volcanics, which came out of Saddleback Mountain, now a collapsed volcanic vent. The Kiama Blowhole is part of an erosion process on the more recent rock, formed into columnar basalt, or latite. Before the cedar-getters had even arrived in the area, around 1810, the local Indigenous Australians Wodi Wodi of the language group Dharawal had been using the land for thousands of years, moving every six weeks or so in family groups. This is supported by a midden of shells at nearby Bass Point used for more than 17,000 years. During this time the whole coastal hills was covered in rainforest and cedar brush. There is evidence of a flourishing culture with intricate possum cloaks, a developed song and story cycle and a deep understanding of the many plants of the rainforest. Only a few remnants of rainforest survive along the escarpment in places like the Minnamurra Rainforest Centre. There is strong evidence of recent sea debris showing a mega-tsunami hit this coast around 1487 A.D according to Dr Ted Bryant of Wollongong University. The first European to explore the area was George Bass who stopped there on his whaleboat voyage to Bass Strait on 6 December 1797. He noted the beauty and complexity of the Kiama area and was astounded when he first discovered the blowhole.

During the colonisation of Australia, the Kiama area was settled by wheat farmers as the soil was volcanic and rain-swept unlike most of Australia. Early Jamberoo was the population centre from about 1830 to the 1860s and when the wheat died, the farmers switched to dairying. During this period Kiama became the best example of 'chain migration' in Australia as many assisted migrants came from Northern Ireland on clearing leases and eventually half the marriages in the Kiama Anglican Church in a hundred years had Northern Irish Protestant ancestry. Kiama was one of the birthplaces of the Australian dairy industry with the first Dairy Factory and first Dairy Co-operative in Australia. There were three original major land grants, Thomas Surfleet Kendall , Michael Hindmarsh and Thomas Chapman, all of which married sisters of the Rutter family. The Kendalls were cousins of Henry Kendall, the famous Australian poet. The Kendall name is remembered today in several places such as the spooky Kendall Cemetery in Kiama Heights and Kendalls Beach. The Hindmarshs are remembered in Kiama's main park, Hindmarsh Park, and after 10 generations still live on their original land.

Kiama's next real population boom was powered by its quarries. Many Irish Catholics worked in the Kiama quarries. The basalt formed by two volcanic eruptions 240 million years and 66 million years ago was a valuable commodity for a growing colony, with the blue metal used to pave Sydney's roads and as ballast for its railways. It was very similar to the basalt found in Northern Island, where the Giant's Causeway is a famous example. There are still active quarries in the Kiama area, including the N.S.W. Railway Quarry, and the remnants of earlier quarries are easily visible throughout the town and often have facilities built inside them such as the Kiama Leisure Centre. .

When Kiama Harbour was hollowed out, after 17 years hard work, and flooded in 1876, larger steamers such as from the Illawarra Steam Navigation Company could enter and a flourishing sea trade followed. The Kiama Pilot's Cottage was finished in 1881 and the Kiama Lighthouse in 1887. Kiama really hit its boom time in this period, from 1890 until the Great Depression in 1927, when nearly all the quarries closed. It was a prosperous and happy time well recorded in the local newspaper, the Kiama Independent and the photographs of the Cocks Photographic Studio, two valuable resources which tell most of the Kiama story.

Over time tourism and housing growth turned Kiama into a dormitory suburb and summer tourist spot. Kiama in 2009 is a tourism haven in summer, during which its population triples. The Kiama Pilot's Cottage is now a local history museum.

The Kiama area includes many attractions, being situated on the coast south of the Minnamurra River, and to the west lie the foothills of Saddleback Mountain and the smaller less discernible peak of Mount Brandon. Also to the west is the town of Jamberoo with pasture-land in between, which contains many historic buildings and dry stone walls. Also of note is Seven Mile Beach to the south, a protected reserve. Kiama has several well known surfing beaches, including Surf Beach, 'Mystics' and Jones' Beach, as well as other more protected swimming beaches situated in coves between headlands such as Black Beach, Easts Beach and Kendalls Beach. Kiama Harbour forms one of several coves between headlands.

Kiama has an oceanic climate typical of southern and central New South Wales with warm summers and mild winters. Rainfall is spread relatively evenly throughout the year with the wettest months being in autumn and the driest in spring.

The town is served by Kiama Station on the South Coast Line. It is served by road in the form of the Princes Highway and the Kiama Bypass.


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