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Dee Why Real Estate Agents

Free performance report on all Dee Why agents

Dee Why Real Estate Agents Report - It's free

There are 151 real estate agents servicing Dee Why and surrounds. In 2014 they sold 654 properties. We have analysed all these Dee Why agents and on request within 24 hours we will send you a free, up-to-date report on their performance, sales track record and what fees you should pay. View report contents

We are the only service in Australia that analyses all local agents and their performance, and provides this to you in a transparent and unbiased manner. View frequently asked questions

We pride ourselves on providing independent, insightful analysis on real estate agents. Read real client case studies to see how we continually exceed expectations. We never disclose your details to any agents unless you specifically instruct us to do so.

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Dee Why Real Estate Agents - As featured in
Dee Why Property Market Summary

Real Estate Agents Dee Why – 2012/13 Performance

Dee Why Real Estate Agents sold 654 properties over the last 12 months (72 houses and 582 units). On average these 72 Dee Why houses took 68 days to sell and were sold at an average discount of -8% from their initial listing price. Dee Why units on average took 53 days to sell and were sold at an average discount of -5% from their initial listing price.

The best Dee Why Real Estate Agents sell properties considerably better than these average figures. We detail who these Dee Why agents are in our free report

Importantly it is the performance of the individual real estate agent rather than the agency used that matters. With over 151 agents operating in the Warringah council area servicing the Dee Why market and 57 agencies, vendors should only use those Dee Why agents who routinely deliver superior results for their clients. This is crucial to maximise their chances of securing the best possible price for their Dee Why property.

With total house growth of 20% over the last five years Dee Why agents have had it reasonably easy selling into an appreciating market. Units have fared not as well growing at 19%. Growth in Dee Why houses over the last year has been below the five year annual growth rate, coming in at -2% for houses (5yr average 4%) and below for units -4% (5yr average 4%).

Request your free report for the individual performance details of real estate agents in Dee Why and the properties they have sold over the last couple of years.

With Dee Why houses only selling on average every 9 years and units every 7 years, securing the best Dee Why real estate agent to manage this infrequent transaction is crucial.

At the end of the day choosing the best Dee Why real estate agent to sell your property can make years of difference to your personal financial situation.

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Suburb Overview

Dee Why is a suburb of northern Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia 18 kilometres north-east of the Sydney central business district. It is the administrative centre of the local government area of Warringah Council, and along with Brookvale is considered to be the main centre of the Northern Beaches region.

The origin of the name of neighbouring Long Reef is obvious, but the reasons for Dee Why's name remain unclear. The earliest reference to it is a pencil note in surveyor James Meehan 's field book, "Wednesday, 27th Sept, 1815 Dy Beach - Marked a Honey Suckle Tree near the Beach". What it meant to him was not recorded, although various claims have been put forward, including

From 1840 the name was recorded as one word, 'Deewhy', but was split in two during the 1950s . The term 'Dee Why' was also used to name 'Dee Why Heights' or Highlands, known as Narraweena since 1951, and 'Dee Why West', the name of which was changed to Cromer in 1969.

Dee Why Post Office opened on 26 April 1915. Dee Why Beach Post Office opened on 1 December 1945 and closed in 1979. Dee Why North Post Office opened on 1 October 1959 and closed in 1993.

Little is known of the Aboriginal people who lived in the Dee Why area before European occupation, although there is evidence of a midden at the southern end of Dee Why Beach, and the indigenous people were known to fish on the then wider and deeper lagoon, where black swans were once seen in large flocks.

The first land in the area to be listed by the New South Wales government Gazette was 700 acres granted to William Cossar in the early 19th century, but by the mid-19th century most of the land in what is now Dee Why had been acquired by James Jenkins and other members of the Jenkins family. Elizabeth Jenkins, eldest daughter of James, gave all her land to the Salvation Army upon her death in 1900, in recognition of their support in her old age. The Salvation Army received in total 1,740 acres of land, 200 acres of which were in Dee Why. An industrial farm, as well as hostels for boys, girls and women were established on this land. Access to the beach was limited by the Salvation Army's land, with a wire netting barrier running along its length.

Warringah Council was formed in 1906, giving Dee Why residents a local government. In 1911 it was decided that the tram line that had expanded in sections from Manly since 1903 was to be extended from Brookvale on to Collaroy Beach via Pittwater Road, and soon after to Narrabeen. The line opened on 3 August 1912 with an hourly service, and it was perhaps this development that caused the Salvation Army in 1913 to progressively sell off most of its holdings on the Northern Beaches, starting with The Oaks Estate Auction, which gave its name to one of the main streets of Dee Why, Oaks Avenue. Another main street, Howard Avenue, commemorates Commissioner Thomas Howard, the first commissioner of the Salvation Army in Australia and New Zealand. By 1920, most of Dee Why had been subdivided. From the end of 1938, the trams, as a result of losses due to low population density and competition with new bus routes that duplicated their services, operated only at peak hours for commuters and on weekends for tourists, and finally ceased operating with the final run on 30 September 1939.

In 1971, work began on a new Dee Why civic centre, inspired by Sulman Prize-winning architects Edwards, Madigan & Torzillo. The building was completed in 1972 and the Council moved there in 1973 from the Shire Hall in Brookvale where meetings had been held since 1912, making Dee Why the seat of Warringah Council.

Dee Why is contained in the drainage basin of Dee Why Lagoon, and stretches from Victor Road in the west to Dee Why Beach in the east, and from the crest of Wingala Hill to the northern edge of Dee Why Lagoon. The Bicentennial Coastal Walkway from Queenscliff to Palm Beach leads from North Curl Curl Beach in the south, along the cliffs of Dee Why Head and down to the southern end of Dee Why Beach. The track exhibits the coastal heath ecosystem that used to be spread all over the Warringah area, and has been extensively regenerated since 1991.


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