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Port Macquarie Real Estate Agents

Free performance report on all Port Macquarie agents

Port Macquarie Real Estate Agents Report - It's free

There are 93 real estate agents servicing Port Macquarie and surrounds. In 2014 they sold 996 properties. We have analysed all these Port Macquarie agents and on request within 24 hours we will send you a free, up-to-date report on their performance, sales track record and what fees you should pay. View report contents

We are the only service in Australia that analyses all local agents and their performance, and provides this to you in a transparent and unbiased manner. View frequently asked questions

We pride ourselves on providing independent, insightful analysis on real estate agents. Read real client case studies to see how we continually exceed expectations. We never disclose your details to any agents unless you specifically instruct us to do so.

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Which Real Estat Agent is an Australian company (ACN ​092 013 931) established in 2011. We provide professional, free services to property sellers Australia wide, with operations in Sydney & Melbourne.
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Port Macquarie Real Estate Agents - As featured in
Port Macquarie Property Market Summary

Real Estate Agents Port Macquarie – 2012/13 Performance

Port Macquarie Real Estate Agents sold 996 properties over the last 12 months (650 houses and 346 units). On average these 650 Port Macquarie houses took 109 days to sell and were sold at an average discount of -8% from their initial listing price. Port Macquarie units on average took 131 days to sell and were sold at an average discount of -9% from their initial listing price.

The best Port Macquarie Real Estate Agents sell properties considerably better than these average figures. We detail who these Port Macquarie agents are in our free report

Importantly it is the performance of the individual real estate agent rather than the agency used that matters. With over 93 agents operating in the Port Macquarie-Hastings council area servicing the Port Macquarie market and 35 agencies, vendors should only use those Port Macquarie agents who routinely deliver superior results for their clients. This is crucial to maximise their chances of securing the best possible price for their Port Macquarie property.

With total house growth of 10% over the last five years Port Macquarie agents have had a reasonably difficult market to contend with. Selling properties well in a slow market is much more difficult. Units have fared not as well growing at 3%. Growth in Port Macquarie houses over the last year has been below the five year annual growth rate, coming in at -4% for houses (5yr average 2%) and below for units -6% (5yr average 1%).

Request your free report for the individual performance details of real estate agents in Port Macquarie and the properties they have sold over the last couple of years.

With Port Macquarie houses only selling on average every 8 years and units every 7 years, securing the best Port Macquarie real estate agent to manage this infrequent transaction is crucial.

At the end of the day choosing the best Port Macquarie real estate agent to sell your property can make years of difference to your personal financial situation.

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Suburb Overview

Port Macquarie is a city on the Mid North Coast of New South Wales, Australia, about 390 km north of Sydney, and 570 km south of Brisbane. The city is located on the coast, at the mouth of the Hastings River, and has an estimated population of 44,313.

The site of Port Macquarie was first visited by Europeans in 1818 when John Oxley reached the Pacific Ocean from the interior, after his journey to explore inland New South Wales. He named the location after the Governor of New South Wales, Lachlan Macquarie.

Oxley noted that 'the port abounds with fish, the sharks were larger and more numerous than I have ever before observed. The forest hills and rising grounds abounded with large kangaroos and the marshes afford shelter and support to innumerable wild fowl. Independent of the Hastings River, the area is generally well watered, there is a fine spring at the very entrance to the Port'.

In 1821, Port Macquarie was founded as the first penal settlement, replacing Newcastle as the destination for convicts that had committed secondary crimes in New South Wales. Newcastle, which had fulfilled this role for the previous two decades, had lost the features required for a place for dumping irredeemable criminals, that being isolation, which was lost as the Hunter Valley was opened up to farmers, and large amounts of hard labour, which had diminished as the cedar in the area ran out and the settlement grew in size. Port Macquarie, however, with its thick bush, tough terrain and local aborigines that were keen to return escaping prisoners in return for tobacco and blankets, provided large amounts of both isolation and hard labour to keep the criminals in control. Under its first commandant, Francis Allman, who was fond of the flogging, the settlement became hell, where the convicts had limited liberties, especially in regard to being in possession of letters and writing papers, which could get a convict up to 100 lashes.

Due to the lack of liberties of the settlement, Ralph Darling, governor of New South Wales, quickly sent many 'specials' or literate convicts with a decent education who had voiced negative views about him. Later on in the settlements history, in the 1830s, disabled convicts started to arrive. One-armed men would be grouped together and required to break stones, men with wooden legs would become delivery men, and the blind would often be given tasks during the night which they performed more skilfully than those with sight.

In 1823 the first sugar cane to be cultivated in Australia was planted there. The region was first opened to settlers in 1830 and later on in the decade the penal settlement was closed in favour of a new penal settlement at Moreton Bay. Settlers quickly took advantage of the area's good pastoral land, timber resources and fisheries.

St Thomas

In 1840 the

Over 20 shipwrecks occurred in the Tacking Point area before a lighthouse was designed by James Barnet and erected there in 1879 by Shepard and Mortley. Tacking Point Lighthouse is classified by the National Trust of Australia .


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