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Merredin Real Estate Agents

Free performance report on all Merredin agents

Merredin Real Estate Agents Report - It's free

There are 3 real estate agents servicing Merredin and surrounds. In 2014 they sold 11 properties. We have analysed all these Merredin agents and on request within 24 hours we will send you a free, up-to-date report on their performance, sales track record and what fees you should pay. View report contents

We are the only service in Australia that analyses all local agents and their performance, and provides this to you in a transparent and unbiased manner. View frequently asked questions

We pride ourselves on providing independent, insightful analysis on real estate agents. Read real client case studies to see how we continually exceed expectations. We never disclose your details to any agents unless you specifically instruct us to do so.

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Which Real Estat Agent is an Australian company (ACN ​092 013 931) established in 2011. We provide professional, free services to property sellers Australia wide, with operations in Sydney & Melbourne.
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Merredin Real Estate Agents - As featured in
Merredin Property Market Summary

Real Estate Agents Merredin – 2012/13 Performance

Merredin Real Estate Agents sold 11 houses over the last 12 months. On average these 11 Merredin houses took 161 days to sell and were sold at an average discount of -16% from their initial listing price.

The best Merredin Real Estate Agents sell properties considerably better than these average figures. We detail who these Merredin agents are in our free report.

Importantly it is the performance of the individual real estate agent rather than the agency used that matters. With over 3 agents operating in the Merredin council area servicing the Merredin market and 1 agencies, vendors should only use those Merredin agents who routinely deliver superior results for their clients. This is crucial to maximise their chances of securing the best possible price for their Merredin property.

With total house price growth of 58% over the last five years Merredin agents have had it reasonably easy selling into an appreciating market. Growth in Merredin houses over the last year has been below the five year annual growth rate, coming in at 3% (5yr average 12%).

Request your free report for the individual performance details of real estate agents in Merredin and the properties they have sold over the last couple of years.

With Merredin property transactions only occurring on average every 7 years, securing the best Merredin real estate agent to manage this infrequent transaction is crucial.

At the end of the day choosing the best Merredin real estate agent to sell your property can make years of difference to your personal financial situation.

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Suburb Overview

Merredin is a town in Western Australia, located in the Central Wheatbelt roughly midway between Perth and Kalgoorlie, on Route 94, Great Eastern Highway. It is connected by public transport to Perth via Transwa Prospector and MerredinLink rail services.

Merredin's history varies from that of other wheat-belt towns in Western Australia in the sense that it started as a stopping place on the way to the goldfields. The first European explorer into the area was the Surveyor General J. S. Roe, who travelled through the region in 1836 but was not impressed by its dryness and the low rainfall.

By the 1850s sandalwood cutters were in the area but there was little agriculture. It was not until Assistant Surveyor Charles Cooke Hunt explored the area in the period 1864

Hunt made five journeys through the area. Of the five journeys the first was exploratory, the second established a track which moved from waterhole to waterhole and the third built a series of wells and dams. The result was a road which later became known as the York to Goldfields road and, until the arrival of the railway, was the only link between the coast and the gold towns of Kalgoorlie and Coolgardie.

It is almost certain that Hunt climbed Merredin Peak and that he heard the town's name from the local Aborigines. Hunt claimed that the local Aborigines referred to the place as 'Merriding' while other explanations suggest that the name comes from 'merrit-in' - 'the place of the merrit' - or that it was the name used by the Aborigines to describe the 'huge bare granite rock' which the locals call Merredin Rock but which is officially named Merredin Peak.

In the late 1860s a number of large pastoral leases were taken up in the area but no township evolved. As late as 1889, when Assistant Surveyor Henry King set up camp on the north side of Merredin Rock, there was still no township. The first settlement was established to the north of Merredin Peak on the York to the Goldfields road but it was hastily moved when the railway, which could not follow the gradients of Hunts Road, was built a few kilometres to the south.

The town really came into existence as a result of the goldrush. In 1888 the area to the east of Merredin was officially proclaimed a goldfield and over the next decade prospectors and fossickers poured through the area. Gold was discovered at Coolgardie in 1892 and at Kalgoorlie a year later. At first the prospectors used Hunt's waterholes road and this meant that they passed through the site of the modern town. In 1893 the railway reached the town. Merredin's importance as a town was directly related to the establishment of a superb water catchment scheme on Merredin Peak.

A rock wall was built around the contours of Merredin Peak. It led to a 100 m channel which in turn led into a dam which had a storage capacity of 25 million litres. The scheme held every drop of water which landed on the Peak and directed it all into the dam which provided water for both the town and the railway. The entire structure is still intact and can be easily reached at the northern end of town. Constructed between 1893 and 1896, the Railway Dam ensured that Merredin would become much more than just another wheat-belt siding.

The need for the water from Merredin Peak disappeared in 1903 when C. Y. O'Connor 's 565 km pipeline was completed. The pipeline joined the waterless goldfields at Kalgoorlie with the plentiful supplies of water in the Helena River east of Perth. Merredin Peak's Railway Dam continued to supply water to the railway until 1968 and even today is still used as the water supply for the fountain outside the Merredin Railway Museum.


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